collapse
2019 Donation Drive

It's time for our annual Server Donation Drive! We need to raise at least $650 (same as last year) to keep The Cauldron's server online for another year. Please help! Either hit that Paypal button to the right and make a one-time donation in any amount or set up a monthly Bronze, Silver or Gold Donor subscription. You can find more info in this message!

Donations as of 13 Sept 2019: $656 donated. $6 more our minimum goal! Let's beat last year's total of $99 more than the minimum!


Note: This total is updated manually, usually once a day


* "Unable to verify referring url. Please go back and try again" Problem Logging In?

If you get an "Unable to verify referring url. Please go back and try again" error when you try to log in, you need to be sure you are accessing the board with a url that starts with "https://ecauldron.com".  If it starts with https://www.ecauldron.com" (or "http://www.ecauldron.com") you will get this error because "www.ecauldron.com" is not technically the same website as "ecauldron.com". Moving to the more secure "https" means it is more picky about such things.

Author Topic: Using cosmetic for spell work  (Read 3139 times)

Emma Eldritch

  • Staff
  • *
  • Join Date: May 2012
  • Posts: 1265
  • Country: 00
  • Total likes: 67
    • View Profile
    • https://rocknrollwitch.blogspot.ca/
Re: Using cosmetic for spell work
« Reply #15 on: April 20, 2014, 09:37:15 pm »
Quote from: PrincessKLS;145788
Yes I saw their suggestions but I was also wondering where to buy some special ones meant for spell work.

 
Well, I dunno about magic lipsticks (I'm tempted to say 'Sephora' but I'm teasing) but you can buy perfumes and the like that are magical in nature. Lucky Mojo sells condition oils, and places like Black Phoenix Alchemy Labs sell perfume oil blends with particular aims in mind.

I have no issue with buying supplies premade, but if you don't have your basics down they won't do you much good.

stephyjh

  • Grand Master Member
  • *******
  • Join Date: Jul 2011
  • Posts: 1597
  • Total likes: 2
    • View Profile
Re: Using cosmetic for spell work
« Reply #16 on: April 20, 2014, 09:57:27 pm »
Quote from: Juni;145798
I think that's a bit simplistic. There is certainly value in learning how to do things oneself, but people use items and the expertise of others to accomplish things they can't on their own all the time.

I'm not saying that one shouldn't use premade. I'm saying that having the skill is a building block to other work, and that if she's going to magic-roofie the guy, she should at least know how to acquire the drug first.
A heretic blast has been blown in the west,
That what is no sense must be nonsense.

-Robert Burns

Juni

  • Grand Master Member
  • *******
  • Join Date: Jun 2011
  • Posts: 1683
  • Total likes: 2
    • View Profile
    • http://thelittleseawitch.net
Re: Using cosmetic for spell work
« Reply #17 on: April 20, 2014, 10:12:11 pm »
Quote from: stephyjh;145813
I'm not saying that one shouldn't use premade. I'm saying that having the skill is a building block to other work, and that if she's going to magic-roofie the guy, she should at least know how to acquire the drug first.

 
I don't necessarily disagree, I just didn't see that particular nuance in your previous response.
Join the Emboatening Crew over on Kiva! Emboatening the boatless since Opet 2013!

The Little Sea Witch - personal/catch-all blog
MistSeeking - religious blog

PetitAlbert

  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Join Date: Jul 2011
  • Posts: 101
  • Total likes: 0
    • View Profile
Re: Using cosmetic for spell work
« Reply #18 on: April 21, 2014, 02:20:46 pm »
Quote from: PrincessKLS;145490
I've considered and dabbled with using cosmetics on my body for spells. But is it a good way to get the point across, plus I found some of the makeup and where I put it uncomfortable so any suggestion on special products? I've considered temporarily dying my hair, I've tried cheap glitter, any other ideas?


Magical make up is a cool idea. I don't recommend putting any product near your nethers which was not designed to be there - even some products which say that is what they are for (i.e. special shampoos) can be damaging and invite infections.
"We all have something to learn, and something to teach."
30 Days of Magic: take the challenge now!

Petit Albert: This witch\'s blog
Book of Protective Magic by Albert - free 20 page bookzine download

Scales

  • Master Member
  • ******
  • Join Date: Nov 2013
  • Location: BC
  • Posts: 373
  • Country: ca
  • Total likes: 5
    • View Profile
Re: Using cosmetic for spell work
« Reply #19 on: April 22, 2014, 11:44:13 pm »
Quote from: PrincessKLS;145788


 
I have a couple things to say, I think.

First, perhaps this will be of use.

Second, seriously, be careful what you put on your parts, especially if any of it will be going in, at all. Female genitals have a delicate PH balance to maintain, the skin is sensitive and plenty of it is membranous, and otherwise it is really easy to give yourself a yeast infection, injury, or worse. Pointy glitter does not belong on or in the vulva.

Last, as far as specific products: I don't know of any specific 'witchcraft' cosmetics you'd use, and if I were you I'd be weary of people advertising it online (eg on etsy), especially if they won't tell you the grade of the glitter or the ingredients list (which are required to be listed on all makeup/skin products/consumables, so if they won't tell you, it's really sketchy).

That said, you could try seeing if any 'organic'/'all natural' products call your name. They are marginally less likely to react with your skin and might feel a bit more 'spiritual.' You can generally find this sort of thing at health food stores, and lots of mainstream brands (eg Physician's Formula) have organic lines.

I'd suggest, if cosmetic magic is something you think you'd like to do in the long run, buying a set of brushes specifically for applying it. Ecotools brushes are high-quality and natural/cruelty free as well as very cheap for makeup brushes. A large powder brush for this sort of spellwork, and maybe a couple eye area brushes if you think you'd need them in the future. That might help with a sense of ritual and also with dedicating the cosmetics, since there aren't really any specific brands.

Avoid talc and mica, and generally be careful what goes on your body.

This comes to mind as a nice product to dedicate for lovey stuff and also to not hurt your body.

stephyjh

  • Grand Master Member
  • *******
  • Join Date: Jul 2011
  • Posts: 1597
  • Total likes: 2
    • View Profile
Re: Using cosmetic for spell work
« Reply #20 on: April 23, 2014, 02:22:50 am »
Quote from: Scales;145988
I have a couple things to say, I think.

First, perhaps this will be of use.

Second, seriously, be careful what you put on your parts, especially if any of it will be going in, at all. Female genitals have a delicate PH balance to maintain, the skin is sensitive and plenty of it is membranous, and otherwise it is really easy to give yourself a yeast infection, injury, or worse. Pointy glitter does not belong on or in the vulva.

Last, as far as specific products: I don't know of any specific 'witchcraft' cosmetics you'd use, and if I were you I'd be weary of people advertising it online (eg on etsy), especially if they won't tell you the grade of the glitter or the ingredients list (which are required to be listed on all makeup/skin products/consumables, so if they won't tell you, it's really sketchy).

That said, you could try seeing if any 'organic'/'all natural' products call your name. They are marginally less likely to react with your skin and might feel a bit more 'spiritual.' You can generally find this sort of thing at health food stores, and lots of mainstream brands (eg Physician's Formula) have organic lines.

I'd suggest, if cosmetic magic is something you think you'd like to do in the long run, buying a set of brushes specifically for applying it. Ecotools brushes are high-quality and natural/cruelty free as well as very cheap for makeup brushes. A large powder brush for this sort of spellwork, and maybe a couple eye area brushes if you think you'd need them in the future. That might help with a sense of ritual and also with dedicating the cosmetics, since there aren't really any specific brands.

Avoid talc and mica, and generally be careful what goes on your body.

This comes to mind as a nice product to dedicate for lovey stuff and also to not hurt your body.

 
Most of this is good advice, particularly on the "don't put stuff on your parts" and the EcoTools recommendation. I don't use them because they're natural and cruelty free; I use them because they're some of the best brushes for the price that I've found. They clean easily and hold up well, too; I've had mine for over a year.

I will say this, though: whether or not natural/organic stuff causes a reaction depends on what your sensitivity is. "Natural" (which has no legal definition and is effectively just a marketing term) and organic cosmetics are actually more likely to cause me to react, because my sensitivity isn't to fragrance or to chemicals. I have a coconut allergy. Products that tout their plant-based ingredients lists are more likely than any others to break me out, and that's with the consideration that I know of precisely six commercially-available shampoos and three body washes that don't contain coconut ingredients (caprylic/capric glucoside, decyl glucoside, anything starting with coco- or coca-, etc, and that's just because I'm lucky and don't have the allergy to the closely related laureth and lauryl ingredients from palm, or I'd be stuck making my own!) It's actually very dangerous to tell people that natural or organic products are less likely to cause a reaction without knowing what their reaction triggers are.

Like I said, other than that I agree with most of what you've said.
A heretic blast has been blown in the west,
That what is no sense must be nonsense.

-Robert Burns

PrincessKLS

  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Join Date: Apr 2014
  • Location: 1983-10-02
  • Posts: 237
  • Country: us
  • Total likes: 1
    • View Profile
  • Religion: goddess worship grey, folk magick, hoodoo inspired.
  • Preferred Pronouns: she/her
Re: Using cosmetic for spell work
« Reply #21 on: April 23, 2014, 02:50:35 pm »
Quote from: Scales;145988
I have a couple things to say, I think.

First, perhaps this will be of use.

Second, seriously, be careful what you put on your parts, especially if any of it will be going in, at all. Female genitals have a delicate PH balance to maintain, the skin is sensitive and plenty of it is membranous, and otherwise it is really easy to give yourself a yeast infection, injury, or worse. Pointy glitter does not belong on or in the vulva.

Last, as far as specific products: I don't know of any specific 'witchcraft' cosmetics you'd use, and if I were you I'd be weary of people advertising it online (eg on etsy), especially if they won't tell you the grade of the glitter or the ingredients list (which are required to be listed on all makeup/skin products/consumables, so if they won't tell you, it's really sketchy).

That said, you could try seeing if any 'organic'/'all natural' products call your name. They are marginally less likely to react with your skin and might feel a bit more 'spiritual.' You can generally find this sort of thing at health food stores, and lots of mainstream brands (eg Physician's Formula) have organic lines.

I'd suggest, if cosmetic magic is something you think you'd like to do in the long run, buying a set of brushes specifically for applying it. Ecotools brushes are high-quality and natural/cruelty free as well as very cheap for makeup brushes. A large powder brush for this sort of spellwork, and maybe a couple eye area brushes if you think you'd need them in the future. That might help with a sense of ritual and also with dedicating the cosmetics, since there aren't really any specific brands.

Avoid talc and mica, and generally be careful what goes on your body.

This comes to mind as a nice product to dedicate for lovey stuff and also to not hurt your body.

 
Thanks, I could that psychians formula at Wal-Mart.
PrincessKLS

Scales

  • Master Member
  • ******
  • Join Date: Nov 2013
  • Location: BC
  • Posts: 373
  • Country: ca
  • Total likes: 5
    • View Profile
Re: Using cosmetic for spell work
« Reply #22 on: April 23, 2014, 03:25:19 pm »
Quote from: stephyjh;146009
I will say this, though: whether or not natural/organic stuff causes a reaction depends on what your sensitivity is. "Natural" (which has no legal definition and is effectively just a marketing term) and organic cosmetics are actually more likely to cause me to react, because my sensitivity isn't to fragrance or to chemicals. I have a coconut allergy. Products that tout their plant-based ingredients lists are more likely than any others to break me out, and that's with the consideration that I know of precisely six commercially-available shampoos and three body washes that don't contain coconut ingredients (caprylic/capric glucoside, decyl glucoside, anything starting with coco- or coca-, etc, and that's just because I'm lucky and don't have the allergy to the closely related laureth and lauryl ingredients from palm, or I'd be stuck making my own!) It's actually very dangerous to tell people that natural or organic products are less likely to cause a reaction without knowing what their reaction triggers are.

 
Yes, and I shouldn't have glossed over that. I went into it assuming that since she (I think) said she was using basic cheap glitter, that she didn't have any known reactions. Spot-testing would probably be a good idea for whatever she ends up using.

And yes, 'natural' and 'organic' are buzzwords that often don't mean anything. When they are on the truer side, it can at least mean less ingredients, less to look up, and less that have weird names, although I was mostly going off that feeling less chemically might make it easier to feel more spell-y. When I said 'marginally less likely to react' I very much meant the 'marginally' and was mostly going off the request: "I was also wondering where to buy some special ones meant for spell work."

tl;dr you are right and I definitely don't want to endanger anyone (or their skin), but I did mention it for a reason.

stephyjh

  • Grand Master Member
  • *******
  • Join Date: Jul 2011
  • Posts: 1597
  • Total likes: 2
    • View Profile
Re: Using cosmetic for spell work
« Reply #23 on: April 23, 2014, 03:30:25 pm »
Quote from: Scales;146060
Yes, and I shouldn't have glossed over that. I went into it assuming that since she (I think) said she was using basic cheap glitter, that she didn't have any known reactions. Spot-testing would probably be a good idea for whatever she ends up using.

And yes, 'natural' and 'organic' are buzzwords that often don't mean anything. When they are on the truer side, it can at least mean less ingredients, less to look up, and less that have weird names, although I was mostly going off that feeling less chemically might make it easier to feel more spell-y. When I said 'marginally less likely to react' I very much meant the 'marginally' and was mostly going off the request: "I was also wondering where to buy some special ones meant for spell work."

tl;dr you are right and I definitely don't want to endanger anyone (or their skin), but I did mention it for a reason.

 
Might also be worth checking into various Etsy sellers who are making their own cosmetics. Not only is there a tendency to use fewer unpronounceable ingredients, but they'll also be able to speak better to exactly what's in it.
A heretic blast has been blown in the west,
That what is no sense must be nonsense.

-Robert Burns

Scales

  • Master Member
  • ******
  • Join Date: Nov 2013
  • Location: BC
  • Posts: 373
  • Country: ca
  • Total likes: 5
    • View Profile
Re: Using cosmetic for spell work
« Reply #24 on: April 23, 2014, 04:41:02 pm »
Quote from: stephyjh;146061
Might also be worth checking into various Etsy sellers who are making their own cosmetics. Not only is there a tendency to use fewer unpronounceable ingredients, but they'll also be able to speak better to exactly what's in it.

 
Indeed, I used to work for an indie makeup brand as a promoter. I actually cautioned against etsy in my first post, but I thought I'd clarify here that it isn't makeup on etsy that worries me, it's people making '~~~love attraction body powder~~~' and not listing the ingredients that I'm worried about being a problem.

Also, I just read a thing on how to make blush and stuff out of beetroot powder. Basically dry and grind beets, adjust with other stuff, and apply. If you want to make and charge and so on your own tools, that would be an option. It was pretty googleable.

stephyjh

  • Grand Master Member
  • *******
  • Join Date: Jul 2011
  • Posts: 1597
  • Total likes: 2
    • View Profile
Re: Using cosmetic for spell work
« Reply #25 on: April 23, 2014, 11:41:04 pm »
Quote from: Scales;146070
Indeed, I used to work for an indie makeup brand as a promoter. I actually cautioned against etsy in my first post, but I thought I'd clarify here that it isn't makeup on etsy that worries me, it's people making '~~~love attraction body powder~~~' and not listing the ingredients that I'm worried about being a problem.

Also, I just read a thing on how to make blush and stuff out of beetroot powder. Basically dry and grind beets, adjust with other stuff, and apply. If you want to make and charge and so on your own tools, that would be an option. It was pretty googleable.

Oh, yeah. I totally agree with you on the "love attraction body powder" thing. Nothing goes on my skin that doesn't have an ingredient list.
A heretic blast has been blown in the west,
That what is no sense must be nonsense.

-Robert Burns

PrincessKLS

  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Join Date: Apr 2014
  • Location: 1983-10-02
  • Posts: 237
  • Country: us
  • Total likes: 1
    • View Profile
  • Religion: goddess worship grey, folk magick, hoodoo inspired.
  • Preferred Pronouns: she/her
Re: Using cosmetic for spell work
« Reply #26 on: April 25, 2014, 05:26:56 pm »
Quote from: stephyjh;146061
Might also be worth checking into various Etsy sellers who are making their own cosmetics. Not only is there a tendency to use fewer unpronounceable ingredients, but they'll also be able to speak better to exactly what's in it.

 
Thanks for that.
PrincessKLS

PrincessKLS

  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Join Date: Apr 2014
  • Location: 1983-10-02
  • Posts: 237
  • Country: us
  • Total likes: 1
    • View Profile
  • Religion: goddess worship grey, folk magick, hoodoo inspired.
  • Preferred Pronouns: she/her
Re: Using cosmetic for spell work
« Reply #27 on: April 27, 2014, 11:02:31 pm »
Quote from: Valentine;145538
Using cosmetics for magical purposes is a time-honored tradition, so at least when it comes to delivery vector you're on the right track.  Have you considered something other than glitter--like an anointing oil, or standard face makeup?  Maybe enchanting a little pot of eyeshadow powder or a lipstick that you can use repeatedly in a low-impact way?

 

Sure and I have tons of non-glittery makeup but it doesn't feel special or magickal, any suggestions?
PrincessKLS

Scales

  • Master Member
  • ******
  • Join Date: Nov 2013
  • Location: BC
  • Posts: 373
  • Country: ca
  • Total likes: 5
    • View Profile
Re: Using cosmetic for spell work
« Reply #28 on: April 27, 2014, 11:18:35 pm »
Quote from: PrincessKLS;146345
Sure and I have tons of non-glittery makeup but it doesn't feel special or magickal, any suggestions?

 
Perhaps a different container? If it's pressed you can generally pop the metal pallet out from the compact, if it's loose you can just dump it into wherever. A low, wide jar, or a little wooden box or something.

PrincessKLS

  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Join Date: Apr 2014
  • Location: 1983-10-02
  • Posts: 237
  • Country: us
  • Total likes: 1
    • View Profile
  • Religion: goddess worship grey, folk magick, hoodoo inspired.
  • Preferred Pronouns: she/her
Re: Using cosmetic for spell work
« Reply #29 on: April 27, 2014, 11:21:40 pm »
Quote from: Unmutual;145878
Magical make up is a cool idea. I don't recommend putting any product near your nethers which was not designed to be there - even some products which say that is what they are for (i.e. special shampoos) can be damaging and invite infections.

 

Okay I thought there was special makeup for the nether region. I really did consider getting body paint for the area for the spell. But the thing is, I really want something colorful but sensitive enough for the clitorial area (sorry for being graphic).
PrincessKLS

Tags:
 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
10 Replies
11593 Views
Last post April 29, 2014, 10:34:25 am
by Kylara
19 Replies
2395 Views
Last post March 31, 2012, 05:59:14 pm
by Maps
85 Replies
7882 Views
Last post August 20, 2013, 02:30:40 pm
by Elizabeth G.
7 Replies
1413 Views
Last post May 07, 2014, 11:01:38 pm
by Faemon
5 Replies
3407 Views
Last post August 09, 2016, 10:25:06 am
by Holdasown

* Who's Online

  • Dot Guests: 20
  • Dot Hidden: 0
  • Dot Users: 0

There aren't any users online.

* Please Donate!

The Cauldron's server is expensive and requires monthly payments. Please become a Bronze, Silver or Gold Donor if you can. Donations are needed every month. Without member support, we can't afford the server.

* In Memoriam

Chavi (2006)
Elspeth (2010)
Marilyn (2013)

* Cauldron Staff

Co-Hosts:
LyricFox & Randall

Senior Staff:
Darkhawk

Message Board Staff
Board Coordinator:
Sunflower

Assistant Board Coordinator:
Aster Breo

Board Staff:
Allaya, Chatelaine, HarpingHawke, Jenett, Morag, rocquelaire, Sefiru

Discord Chat Staff
Chat Coordinator:
Morag

Reserve Staff:
Aisling

Cauldron Council:
Bob, Catja, Emma-Eldritch, Fausta, Jubes, Kelly, Phouka, Sperran, Star, Steve, Tana

Cauldron Assistants
[Non-Staff Positions]

Site Assistants
[Non-Staff Positions]
Webmaster:
Randall