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I just wanted to bump this thread for my own edification. There are some links and references here that I have not seen before.

I'm (very slowly) doing the New Order of Druids Bardic course.
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Miscellaneous Religious Discussions / Practices that still work
« Last post by EclecticWheel on Yesterday at 05:22:30 pm »
Are there any practices or ideas from your previous religious background (if you have one) or prior worldview that still work for you? or that you have adapted to a new context?  How did you adapt them?

Because of the nature of my path, there are lots of things for me in this category, but for me, my style of prayer is largely the same, but the content and interpretation of the prayers are different.  I have had to write the bulk of my prayer rule, but the matter is that I still have one, and the style is largely the same.
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Paganism For Beginners / Re: Spiritual Tear Down
« Last post by Jenett on Yesterday at 05:04:57 pm »
Went as planed reread my post.

Hey, Sevensons -

I know we've mentioned this before in the past. Many of your posts are very confusing and hard to read. When someone says they don't understand what you meant, telling them to read it again comes across as rude and unhelpful.

If you don't want to discuss the topic more that is fine, but then you should expect that people may not want to interact with your posts. Text is a limited way to communicate, and all we have are your words. If we can't understand your words, and you don't try to explain in a different way, we can't have a conversation.

Jenett, with her staff hat in view in hopes of improving this strand of conversation.
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Paganism For Beginners / Re: Spiritual Tear Down
« Last post by Jenett on Yesterday at 05:02:33 pm »
Yes, I have looked at the whole list. Unfortunately, my City Library does not seem to carry any of these books. I might check up at the University Library where I can get Library Privileges because I am an Alum. I really do not have the money to go and buy some of these books. Anyway, thanks for pointing out that book. It looks pretty good. Maybe I will find it up at the University.

So, one of the things about libraries is that they have collection development policies (which is the fancy library jargon for 'what books and materials do we buy with other people's money...') A public library is going to have different policies than an academic library, and a high school library is going to have different policies than the library I work in (which is a research library serving a particular area of education.)

If you're trying to figure out whether a given title is potentially available through your library access (whether that's a public library, a larger library consortium, a university library, or through services like interlibrary loan), I usually start with the easiest catalog (the library I use most), and then try WorldCat (http://worldcat.org), which is a cooperative catalog of thousands of libraries around the world. You can enter your zip code/postal code/equivalent, and it will sort the libraries that have it by proximity.

(There are many libraries that aren't part of WorldCat, for a wide range of reasons - starting with the fact it costs money and staff time to manage, but it will give you a decent sense of 'is a library copy of this likely to be available near me'. You sometimes also have to poke around at different editions to find the records that have the editions near you.)

Looking at the last two titles mentioned here, I get some interesting results that make a useful contrast, so...

Book the first:
In search of the Indo-Europeans: language, archaeology, and myth by J.P. Mallory is listed in 940 libraries across editions - that's a pretty respectable number. For me, in the Boston metro area, with approximately a zillion (unscientific term) colleges and universities in the area with a wide range of programs, the first two pages of results are within a dozen miles of me.

Looking at those results, however, I don't see any of the public library systems near me (in Boston, we have several larger library consortia, depending on where you live, plus anyone living, working, or going to school in the state can get privileges in the Boston Public Library system). That doesn't surprise me, because looking at the information about the book, it's not an academic publisher exactly (it's not a university press) but it is a press that specialises in more academic books, especially with complex illustrations.

So that's a book that a) is probably going to be more expensive to buy (colour plates usually are, even if you find used copies), and b) is probably available via interlibrary loan. (More on that in a sec.)

Book the second:
When I search on Deep ancestors : practicing the religion of the proto-Indo-Europeans by Ceisiwr Serith, in contrast, I get 8 results, worldwide in WorldCat across all editions (here's the record)

That means that, probably, few libraries are going to have it anywhere else. And when I look at the publisher info, I can see why - it's published by ADF itself. That doesn't make it a bad book, but it does make it a niche book.

Libraries have limited budgets, limited shelf space, and limited time to figure out what new books they're getting - so they rely heavily on reviews in established publications (mostly aimed at libraries and bookstores) to figure out what titles to add. No public library is going to collect a lot of niche material on any religion (even Christianity, what they get is still going to be more public-accessible material, not, say, dense theological analysis of St. Augustine or his life.)

Very few Pagan books get reviewed in those publications and honestly, that's okay, because most of the material coming out from Pagan publishers is not a great fit for most public or academic libraries - they're focused in ways that are more detailed and niche topics than a public library or most academic libraries will cover. More general works like historical surveys, or current surveys or books with a very broad general appeal are a lot more likely than something very specific.

Many collection development policies have a requirement (or strong request) that a book have good editorial reviews from neutral publications (i.e. industry review publications, journals in a particular field, etc.) or some other measure of review that often isn't in place for Pagan or Pagan-community-aimed titles.

Many libraries (if they're not completely budget strapped) have an option to request the library consider purchasing a title (if so, there's often an option for you to give your contact info, and be the first person to check it out if it's added), but these days budgets are tight enough that a book still needs to meet other collection considerations (like cost and how appealing it may be to the library's user base) before it will be added.

On the other hand, this is probably a book where if you want to read it, you're going to need to find a copy through Pagan community sources, or save up and buy it.

Interlibrary loan
There is an option to get books from other libraries, if there's another library (especially in your state) that carries it. Public libraries and academic libraries are often part of larger library consortia that share resources, since often there's enough demand for a title or reason to have it to have one or two in the state, but not one in every academic library, or every public library. In addition to smaller consortia, there's also often (in the US) a state-level resource that coordinates and provides additional materials.

Your local librarian can explain what the interlibrary loan policies are for your library. In some places, it's free, in some places, there's a small fee to cover the costs of getting the book to and from the lending library to your library. In many cases, you also get a limited time with the book, not multiple renewals.

More about interlibrary loan and how it works on my research blog. Also more about library selection policies and some other resources for inexpensive books.

However, all of this depends on some library with connections to your library having a copy in the first place. And for Ceisiwr Serith's book, that's not terribly likely (not impossible, but 8 results worldwide is not promising.)
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It has been posted elsewhere, but Emma Restall Orr's book Principles of Druidry is available to read for free online: https://druidnetwork.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/What-is-Druidry.pdf

Orr also has a little course out there for free (more a study guide/companion piece to the book): https://druidnetwork.org/what-is-druidry/learning-resources/perennial/

The New Order of Druids has free courses for all three degrees: http://www.druidcircle.org/druid/index.php/en/druid-college/list-of-courses

Or you can just buy the books for each degree, and some more: http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/neworderofdruids

I just wanted to bump this thread for my own edification. There are some links and references here that I have not seen before.
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Paganism For Beginners / Re: Spiritual Tear Down
« Last post by Donal2018 on Yesterday at 01:47:01 pm »
I wonder if you saw the book further down on the booklist, Deep Ancestors: Practicing the Religion of the Proto-Indo-Europeans by Ceisiwr Serith. It's been in the back of my mind to read this when I can see over the top of my TBR pile...

Yes, I have looked at the whole list. Unfortunately, my City Library does not seem to carry any of these books. I might check up at the University Library where I can get Library Privileges because I am an Alum. I really do not have the money to go and buy some of these books. Anyway, thanks for pointing out that book. It looks pretty good. Maybe I will find it up at the University.
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Paganism For Beginners / Re: Spiritual Tear Down
« Last post by Starlight on Yesterday at 06:39:25 am »
So I found the reference to that book I mentioned and figured I would post it here in case anyone was interested.

It is "In Search Of The Indo-Europeans: Language, Archaeology, And Myth", by J.P. Mallory.

This book was listed on the ADF (A Druid Fellowship) reading list:

www.adf.org/training/resources/reading.html

I wonder if you saw the book further down on the booklist, Deep Ancestors: Practicing the Religion of the Proto-Indo-Europeans by Ceisiwr Serith. It's been in the back of my mind to read this when I can see over the top of my TBR pile...
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Paganism For Beginners / Re: Exclusion
« Last post by Local Magpie on Yesterday at 01:09:54 am »
Hello everyone!
\
I posted this long before it was meant to go up, my full post is:
"Hello everyone! To make a long story short, my beliefs have always resonated with Goddess spirituality but I've avoided really exploring due to the air of exclusion and gender essentialism around it. I really resonate with the creation myth of a Great Goddess 'birthing' the universe and everything ultimately returning to her, the interconnected and interdependent nature of everything. But that's how I view deity and cosmic forces, which I believe are ultimately unknowable in their 'truest form' in you will. It helps me to view deity as Goddesses, the reasons for which are probably a huge thing to unpack in and of itself.

But I also don't want my religion to feel exclusive. Many women don't connect with the idea of a sacred/creative womb, such as transgender women or women who chose/or cannot have children. And I don't want to feel like I'm leaving those all the people out, because their experiences as women are valuable, regardless of whether or not their experiences are like mine. I also feel bad that many men may feel excluded because I think anyone who wants to worship the Goddess should, regardless of anything else.

Nor do I want my religion to be rooted in gender essentialism or only valuing women for their ability to have children. I do think that a lot of our perception of what is feminine or masculine is based in how we were socialized, but knowing that doesn't mean I can throw my entire concept of gender out the window. Both our sex and our gender influence how we are treated, and more importantly, how we perceive ourselves. We shouldn't be boiled down to 'just' our sex or gender because we are all more complex than that, but I don't think that part of our identity should be overlooked.

For example, I see menstruation as a normal process that shouldn't be shamed and I can see why some women might see their menstrual cycles as part of a great cycle of life-death-rebirth or a symbol of their creative power. In theory I can relate, but on a personal note, I'm not at a place where I can deal with the intense stress that menstruation brings for me.

I'm not sure if this makes any sense but basically, I'm worried that I'm being to exclusive by focusing on Goddess spirituality."
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Paganism For Beginners / Goddess Spirituality: Exclusion
« Last post by Local Magpie on Yesterday at 12:44:58 am »
Hello everyone! To make a long story short, my beliefs have always resonated with Goddess spirituality but I've avoided really exploring due to the air of exclusion and gender essentialism around it. I really resonate with the creation myth of a Great Goddess 'birthing' the universe and everything ultimately returning to her, the interconnected and interdependent nature of everything. But that's how I view deity and cosmic forces, which I believe are ultimately unknowable in their 'truest form' in you will. It helps me to view deity as Goddesses.

But

I see menstruation as a normal process that shouldn't be shamed and I can see why some women might see their menstrual cycles as part of a great cycle of life-death-rebirth or a symbol of their creative power. In theory I can relate, but on a personal note, I'm not at a place where I can deal with the intense stress that menstruation brings for me.
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Introductions / Re: greetings
« Last post by Voren on August 16, 2019, 11:05:50 pm »
hello there!

i'm kurt. i was lucky enough to be raised by someone who got into paganism way back in the 70s, so i've been practicing druidry all my life (although i prefer to call it reconstructionism now - just a personal choice)

i'm 21, and i spend my time as a reporter for a small-town paper in ontario, but my real passion is writing poetry. i recently graduated from a comedy writing & performance program.

i'm a devotee of cerridwen and brighid, and i eventually plan on studying ancient celtic (specifically welsh) mythology. i love studying languages, cultures & religions!

this is kind of a hectic post because i don't exactly love talking about myself, but i'm really looking forward to getting to know everybody on this site.

Hello and welcome
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