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Author Topic: Titans  (Read 756 times)

MongolianCow

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Titans
« on: March 21, 2016, 12:15:05 am »
It crossed my mind again that the Titans once did ruled the world(depends on what faith you follow) and generally why did most Greeks stop whorshiping them not all were bad.
Best Wishes,
A MughalCow

RecycledBenedict

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Re: Titans
« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2016, 07:51:32 am »
Quote from: MongolianCow;188602
It crossed my mind again that the Titans once did ruled the world(depends on what faith you follow) and generally why did most Greeks stop whorshiping them not all were bad.
Best Wishes,
A MughalCow


The worship of Kronos and Rhea continued.

Rhea was known under the name Meter Theon, 'Mother of the gods', and believed to be identical to Cybele, Ops and Nut. She became even more important in late antiquity, when the religious reforms proposed by Emperor Julian made the Mother of the gods and The Sun the two most important deities, and she was an important deity in the system of the late philosopher Proclus.

Some deites were viewed as children or grandchildren of the titans. Hekate, Helios, Selene, Eos, Leto, Artemis, Apollo, the winds, Asteria and (according to Cicero) Heracles the elder belong to this category.

MongolianCow

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Re: Titans
« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2016, 06:44:36 pm »
Quote from: FraterBenedict;188611
The worship of Kronos and Rhea continued.

Rhea was known under the name Meter Theon, 'Mother of the gods', and believed to be identical to Cybele, Ops and Nut. She became even more important in late antiquity, when the religious reforms proposed by Emperor Julian made the Mother of the gods and The Sun the two most important deities, and she was an important deity in the system of the late philosopher Proclus.

Some deites were viewed as children or grandchildren of the titans. Hekate, Helios, Selene, Eos, Leto, Artemis, Apollo, the winds, Asteria and (according to Cicero) Heracles the elder belong to this category.

 What about others such as Krois or Atlas.

RecycledBenedict

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Re: Titans
« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2016, 07:20:28 pm »
Quote from: MongolianCow;188661
What about others such as Krois or Atlas.


As far as I know, Krios, Koios/Polus and Atlas were not objects of worship.

When it comes to Theia, Hyperion and Phoibe, they might have been older deities of Sun and Moon, but that is guesswork rather than well-established fact.

The wind-god Euros was identified with Vulturnus by the Romans, and due to folk-etymology identified with Volturnus. The latter one has a festival held at 27th of August: Volturnalia.

Folk-etymology was applied all the time in late antiquity. For example: The goddess Meditrina was coined in order to explain what Meditrinalia was all about, since the Romans themselves wasn't sure.

Prometheus is probably more popular among modern adherents of LHP, than he was among ancient Greeks.

MongolianCow

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Re: Titans
« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2016, 07:38:07 pm »
Quote from: FraterBenedict;188663
As far as I know, Krios, Koios/Polus and Atlas were not objects of worship.

When it comes to Theia, Hyperion and Phoibe, they might have been older deities of Sun and Moon, but that is guesswork rather than well-established fact.

The wind-god Euros was identified with Vulturnus by the Romans, and due to folk-etymology identified with Volturnus. The latter one has a festival held at 27th of August: Volturnalia.

Folk-etymology was applied all the time in late antiquity. For example: The goddess Meditrina was coined in order to explain what Meditrinalia was all about, since the Romans themselves wasn't sure.

Prometheus is probably more popular among modern adherents of LHP, than he was among ancient Greeks.

 
Helios was the sun god along with his sister.

RecycledBenedict

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Re: Titans
« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2016, 07:43:09 pm »
Quote from: MongolianCow;188665
Helios was the sun god along with his sister.


His sister Selene is one of the moon goddesses, yes, and their other sister, Eos, is the goddess of dawn and mother of the wind gods (not the storm gods). Helios, Selene and Eos are children of Hyperion and Theia.

Louisvillian

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Re: Titans
« Reply #6 on: March 26, 2016, 07:23:30 am »
Quote from: MongolianCow;188602
It crossed my mind again that the Titans once did ruled the world(depends on what faith you follow) and generally why did most Greeks stop whorshiping them not all were bad.
Best Wishes,
A MughalCow

Adding to what Frater already mentioned, Kronos was worshipped as Saturn by the Romans as a benevolent agricultural god. But, much of that is later Roman interpretation of pre-existing Greek mythological narratives. The fact is, we simply don't know to what extent those narratives explain prior realities. We don't know if the Titanes were worshipped by pre-Greek people or not. Or even if they were originally pre-Greek deities absorbed into Greek narratives. They may have been original developments in the Greek mythic tradition. We simply don't know much about them, other than what is written in Greek myth, and the evidence of cults to some Titans in Greek and Roman religion.
In my opinion, it is unwise to make assumptions in lieu of knowledge.

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Re: Titans
« Reply #7 on: March 26, 2016, 01:16:39 pm »
Quote from: Louisvillian;188928
Adding to what Frater already mentioned, Kronos was worshipped as Saturn by the Romans as a benevolent agricultural god. But, much of that is later Roman interpretation of pre-existing Greek mythological narratives. The fact is, we simply don't know to what extent those narratives explain prior realities. We don't know if the Titanes were worshipped by pre-Greek people or not. Or even if they were originally pre-Greek deities absorbed into Greek narratives. They may have been original developments in the Greek mythic tradition. We simply don't know much about them, other than what is written in Greek myth, and the evidence of cults to some Titans in Greek and Roman religion.
In my opinion, it is unwise to make assumptions in lieu of knowledge.

 
Is it conceivable that the Titans occupied a similar role in the Greek mythos as the Jotuns (giants) do in Norse mythology, embodying to some extent the perilous, unruly forces of nature before they were tamed by the more civilized gods that came after? In which case their function in the mythos is not so much as objects of worship--which would explain why there wasn't much of it directed at them--but as vital players in a narrative that explicates the culture's worldview.
The first song sets the wheel in motion / The second is a song of love / The third song tells of Her devotion / The fourth cries joy from the sky above
The fifth song binds our fate to silence / and bids us live each moment well / The sixth unleashes rage and violence / The seventh song has truth to tell
The last song echoes through the ages / to ask its question all night long / And close the circle on these pages / These, the metamythos songs

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