collapse

* "Unable to verify referring url. Please go back and try again" Problem Logging In?

If you get an "Unable to verify referring url. Please go back and try again" error when you try to log in, you need to be sure you are accessing the board with a url that starts with "https://ecauldron.com".  If it starts with https://www.ecauldron.com" (or "http://www.ecauldron.com") you will get this error because "www.ecauldron.com" is not technically the same website as "ecauldron.com". Moving to the more secure "https" means it is more picky about such things.

Author Topic: Death Anxieties/Wondering if I keep getting drawn back to paganism for a reason  (Read 5363 times)

Xikari

  • Jr. Newbie
  • *
  • Join Date: Nov 2014
  • Posts: 1
  • Total likes: 0
    • View Profile
(This might be better placed in the philosophical section, but seeing as I'm new I didn't want to attempt to place it in a non-beginner friendly area)

I've been studying various forms of paganism and witchcraft for many years now, going on 7 now, since I first entered college. I've stayed with it for a while, but during college about a year after I started studying, I was lying in bed thinking and the thought occurred to me- What if nothing exists after we die? What if we just "poofed" out of existence?

The thought was very jarring, and I pushed it away quickly. Just coming close the threshold of imagining being nothing sent me on the verge of panic. And ever since then, every couple of months, I'll think about it again.

Problem is, it gets more and more persistent, to the point that now, there's not a night that I don't think about it, and it has gotten to the point that it sent me into a full flown panic attack, which I had never experienced before.

If I stop moving around and being active during the day I'll think about it. It's become very disruptive, and I've considered maybe talking to a therapist about it.

That is until tonight when, slightly frightened that my thoughts started to take that turn yet again, I told myself I'm done looking at scientific articles that do nothing but increase my anxiety and found myself looking around on this forum again. (been lurking for about 6 years now on and off)

Thinking back I remember my anxiety took a turn for the worse a couple months ago when I mentioned to my husband that if there is no way to verify if deities exist or not, whats the point of worrying about them? He agreed, since he's a true neutral agnostic that prefers to leave gods and thoughts of death and existence out of his life. He simply doesn't care one way or another. (this is also where I tried to adopt that same line of thought and stopped my studying and tried not to worry about the divine as he does)

But as soon as I came on here, and started reading about many people's relationships with their gods/goddesses/ideals/metaphors/whatever, I felt instantly better. I was thinking about giving a shout out to the gods when I go to sleep tonight and seeing if one of them gives me a sign that they might be interested in me, another try.

That's when a thought occurred to me- what if all this time my existential death anxiety was a god/goddess that embodies that very aspect knocking on my "door" to accept them? (and I've been ignoring it out of fear this entire time?) Is that sort of thing possible?

Faemon

  • Grand Master Member
  • *******
  • Join Date: May 2012
  • Posts: 1229
  • Total likes: 9
    • View Profile
Quote from: Xikari;164055
what if all this time my existential death anxiety was a god/goddess that embodies that very aspect knocking on my "door" to accept them? (and I've been ignoring it out of fear this entire time?) Is that sort of thing possible?

I think so, yes. I mean, where I stand now is recognizing belief itself as an interpretation of our experiences. So, what I'm sure to have is an idea, whether I experience that as a shift in consciousness towards Lovecraftian horror or as a form separate from me that communicates perhaps something more constructive.

Quote
I remember my anxiety took a turn for the worse a couple months ago when I mentioned to my husband that if there is no way to verify if deities exist or not, whats the point of worrying about them? He agreed, since he's a true neutral agnostic that prefers to leave gods and thoughts of death and existence out of his life. He simply doesn't care one way or another. (this is also where I tried to adopt that same line of thought and stopped my studying and tried not to worry about the divine as he does)

But as soon as I came on here, and started reading about many people's relationships with their gods/goddesses/ideals/metaphors/whatever, I felt instantly better.


You could adopt the same philosophy, but the attitude that you have towards it I think would continue to be mostly subconscious. If being able to interact with representations of some aspect of life that has a name and face and personality--if that's more helpful and fulfilling than existentialism, then I'd say by all means pursue it.

A stone cold materialistic truth is something we're necessarily subject to, but an insufficient supplement for the immaterial aspects of life: serenity, comfort, joy, motivation...
The Codex of Poesy: wishcraft, faelatry, alchemy, and other slight misspellings.
the Otherfaith: Chromatic Genderbending Faery Monarchs of Technology. DeviantArt

Emma Eldritch

  • Staff
  • *
  • Join Date: May 2012
  • Posts: 1265
  • Country: 00
  • Total likes: 68
    • View Profile
    • https://rocknrollwitch.blogspot.ca/
Quote from: Xikari;164055
(This might be better placed in the philosophical section, but seeing as I'm new I didn't want to attempt to place it in a non-beginner friendly area)

I've been studying various forms of paganism and witchcraft for many years now, going on 7 now, since I first entered college. I've stayed with it for a while, but during college about a year after I started studying, I was lying in bed thinking and the thought occurred to me- What if nothing exists after we die? What if we just "poofed" out of existence?

The thought was very jarring, and I pushed it away quickly. Just coming close the threshold of imagining being nothing sent me on the verge of panic. And ever since then, every couple of months, I'll think about it again.

Problem is, it gets more and more persistent, to the point that now, there's not a night that I don't think about it, and it has gotten to the point that it sent me into a full flown panic attack, which I had never experienced before.

If I stop moving around and being active during the day I'll think about it. It's become very disruptive, and I've considered maybe talking to a therapist about it.

That is until tonight when, slightly frightened that my thoughts started to take that turn yet again, I told myself I'm done looking at scientific articles that do nothing but increase my anxiety and found myself looking around on this forum again. (been lurking for about 6 years now on and off)

Thinking back I remember my anxiety took a turn for the worse a couple months ago when I mentioned to my husband that if there is no way to verify if deities exist or not, whats the point of worrying about them? He agreed, since he's a true neutral agnostic that prefers to leave gods and thoughts of death and existence out of his life. He simply doesn't care one way or another. (this is also where I tried to adopt that same line of thought and stopped my studying and tried not to worry about the divine as he does)

But as soon as I came on here, and started reading about many people's relationships with their gods/goddesses/ideals/metaphors/whatever, I felt instantly better. I was thinking about giving a shout out to the gods when I go to sleep tonight and seeing if one of them gives me a sign that they might be interested in me, another try.

That's when a thought occurred to me- what if all this time my existential death anxiety was a god/goddess that embodies that very aspect knocking on my "door" to accept them? (and I've been ignoring it out of fear this entire time?) Is that sort of thing possible?

 
When I was ten, I realised I was going to die some day. This was not a pleasant realisation. I have, ever since, had moments where my own mortality seems utterly crushing - I can't say I've ever had a full blown panic attack, but I do get the racing heart and the "OH SHIT" reaction.

I also am overwhelmingly drawn to gods associated with death. It's seriously almost laughable.

I couldn't begin to tell you whether or not you're getting your door knocked on by the cold clammy hand of a death god, or if your fear causes you to subconsciously look for those deities, or what. What I do know is that it can be useful to reach out to these figures because it can teach us an awful lot about our fear, and also an awful lot about life.

Ghost235

  • Sr. Apprentice
  • ****
  • Join Date: Oct 2014
  • Posts: 98
  • Total likes: 0
    • View Profile
Quote from: Xikari;164055
(This might be better placed in the philosophical section, but seeing as I'm new I didn't want to attempt to place it in a non-beginner friendly area)

I've been studying various forms of paganism and witchcraft for many years now, going on 7 now, since I first entered college. I've stayed with it for a while, but during college about a year after I started studying, I was lying in bed thinking and the thought occurred to me- What if nothing exists after we die? What if we just "poofed" out of existence?

The thought was very jarring, and I pushed it away quickly. Just coming close the threshold of imagining being nothing sent me on the verge of panic. And ever since then, every couple of months, I'll think about it again.

Problem is, it gets more and more persistent, to the point that now, there's not a night that I don't think about it, and it has gotten to the point that it sent me into a full flown panic attack, which I had never experienced before.

If I stop moving around and being active during the day I'll think about it. It's become very disruptive, and I've considered maybe talking to a therapist about it.

That is until tonight when, slightly frightened that my thoughts started to take that turn yet again, I told myself I'm done looking at scientific articles that do nothing but increase my anxiety and found myself looking around on this forum again. (been lurking for about 6 years now on and off)



Hello,

I speak as someone who suffers from massive death anxiety as well.  I have some good and bad news from my experience of the past few years.

The bad news is that nobody can really say what happens when we die.  Many people claim to know but they are all full of crap.  This most definitely includes scientific materialists as their evidence doesn't differentiate between the brain as a consciousness generating or consciousness recieving organ(they tend to invoke Occam's razor but in this case that seems to amount to, "One of the options is easier so we'll go with that one" which seems a little weak).  This means that, quite literally, anyone could be correct in regards to what happens when we die.  The Pagans who believe in Summerland, the Dharmic religions, some lost tradition, the ancient Egyptians, or even Jack Chick's Christian fundamentalism or something bizarre that we haven't theorized yet.  

The good news is that death anxiety seems to have an expiration date as you can see in this article(page 28).  Some more good news actually goes into the bad news above.  Since reason and research are pretty much absolute fails in regards to this topic you are pretty much free to stake an opinion and run with it.  At the end of the day, "If I'm a nice person Freyja will take me to the Summerlands where we will re-enact being the Crawleys in Downton Abbey forever" has only slightly less validity than "Consciousness is generated by the brain as opposed to recieving it because figuring out where it actually sits is super hard".

Maybe consider trying various interpretations?  Just set some ground rules(if it involves something terribly unethical or super illegal it is most likely best to leave those out, try each one for about a month or two, basic stuff like that) and delve into a particular interpretation.

One last thing.  For some people not having an opinion on this is valid for them.  However, the sheer extent of thought on the matter shows that they are clearly in the minority.  This makes sense as we spend a very brief amount of time alive and a massive amount of time dead.  So your inquiries in regards to this topic are not only normal but could be argued to be really quite reasonable.

Altair

  • Adept Member
  • ********
  • Join Date: Jul 2011
  • Location: New York, New York
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 3029
  • Country: us
  • Total likes: 401
  • Fly high and make the world follow
    • View Profile
    • Songs of the Metamythos
  • Religion: tree-hugging pagan
  • Preferred Pronouns: he/him/his
Quote from: Xikari;164055
That's when a thought occurred to me- what if all this time my existential death anxiety was a god/goddess that embodies that very aspect knocking on my "door" to accept them? (and I've been ignoring it out of fear this entire time?) Is that sort of thing possible?

I can't say; my relationship with my deities, including the goddess of death, is less about door knocks and more about contemplating them and the meaning of their myths.

What I can do, if it helps with the anxiety, is share the two ways I think about the inevitability of my own nonexistence:

1) [This one is borrowed from Eastern religions.] The "me" I'm so fond of is an illusion to begin with, and a very brief one at that; only the sum total of existence (my own included), the breadth of all the universe, amounts to something real. So when I die, my myopic obsession with "me" gets lifted, and instead my consciousness is replaced by what's been there all along, the interconnected grandeur of Everything.

In short: I'm an integral part of manifest divinity, so when I die, since the universe goes on, "I" go on in a larger sense, in particular in how my life and how I lived added to/shaped the universe around me.

2) I like to think our minds can do all kinds of things. One of them is that time can be very subjective. (Think of how slowly the day can go when you're bored at work.) So perhaps, in the final instant before death, our minds open up our experience of time, so that the eternal afterlife that Christians talk about comes about in our heads, and we can experience whatever we can imagine. (There was a lovely bit about this at the end of the 1999 movie American Beauty, written by Alan Ball.)

Since I can imagine a lot of wild adventures, this doesn't sound so bad. I like to think of this as the gift from the god of time.
 
I don't have much death anxiety, but I'm pretty sure that has less to do with me being all Zen about the two things above, and more with my brain being in fundamental emotional denial about the fact that one day I won't be here.
« Last Edit: November 03, 2014, 09:24:11 am by Altair »
The first song sets the wheel in motion / The second is a song of love / The third song tells of Her devotion / The fourth cries joy from the sky above
The fifth song binds our fate to silence / and bids us live each moment well / The sixth unleashes rage and violence / The seventh song has truth to tell
The last song echoes through the ages / to ask its question all night long / And close the circle on these pages / These, the metamythos songs

Ghost235

  • Sr. Apprentice
  • ****
  • Join Date: Oct 2014
  • Posts: 98
  • Total likes: 0
    • View Profile
Quote from: Altair;164213


What I can do, if it helps with the anxiety, is share the two ways I think about the inevitability of my own nonexistence:

1) [This one is borrowed from Eastern religions.] The "me" I'm so fond of is an illusion to begin with, and a very brief one at that; only the sum total of existence (my own included), the breadth of all the universe, amounts to something real. So when I die, my myopic obsession with "me" gets lifted, and instead my consciousness is replaced by what's been there all along, the interconnected grandeur of Everything.

In short: I'm an integral part of manifest divinity, so when I die, since the universe goes on, "I" go on in a larger sense, in particular in how my life and how I lived added to/shaped the universe around me.

2) I like to think our minds can do all kinds of things. One of them is that time can be very subjective. (Think of how slowly the day can go when you're bored at work.) So perhaps, in the final instant before death, our minds open up our experience of time, so that the eternal afterlife that Christians talk about comes about in our heads, and we can experience whatever we can imagine. (There was a lovely bit about this at the end of the 1999 movie American Beauty, written by Alan Ball.)

Since I can imagine a lot of wild adventures, this doesn't sound so bad. I like to think of this as the gift from the god of time.
 
I don't have much death anxiety, but I'm pretty sure that has less to do with me being all Zen about the two things above, and more with my brain being in fundamental emotional denial about the fact that one day I won't be here.

 
I think that this post is an excellent example of "Your mileage may vary."  

The reason I say that is that, for me, my death anxiety is precisely because your first idea  may very well happen.  I am absolutely disinterested in the "interconnected grandeur of Everything".  I like my consciousness a lot.  It is the only thing that I think of as "mine" that isn't super temporary(like my "stuff") or that isn't really mine("my" girlfriend isn't "mine" in any real sense).  Of course, I recognize that for some people the first idea makes them feel much better.  I'm just not one of them.

The second idea, on the other hand, actually sounds pretty awesome.  In particular, it sounds like the overall premise of "Waking Life".

Altair

  • Adept Member
  • ********
  • Join Date: Jul 2011
  • Location: New York, New York
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 3029
  • Country: us
  • Total likes: 401
  • Fly high and make the world follow
    • View Profile
    • Songs of the Metamythos
  • Religion: tree-hugging pagan
  • Preferred Pronouns: he/him/his
Quote from: Ghost235;164438
I think that this post is an excellent example of "Your mileage may vary."  

The reason I say that is that, for me, my death anxiety is precisely because your first idea  may very well happen.  I am absolutely disinterested in the "interconnected grandeur of Everything".  I like my consciousness a lot.  It is the only thing that I think of as "mine" that isn't super temporary(like my "stuff") or that isn't really mine("my" girlfriend isn't "mine" in any real sense).  Of course, I recognize that for some people the first idea makes them feel much better.  I'm just not one of them.

The second idea, on the other hand, actually sounds pretty awesome.  In particular, it sounds like the overall premise of "Waking Life".


OK, I just had an epiphany (while washing the dishes, which is when many of my epiphanies happen, oddly enough): I've always considered those two ideas of the moment of death--losing the self to a oneness with the universe, vs. the mind opening up an eternity of imagined time--as either/or, and who really knows.

But what if *both* happen simultaneously?

There's a compelling symmetry for me in that: The totality of everything that is/was/will be pours into an instant, and that same instant expands the wildest dreams of the self to eternity.

What an incomprehensibly beautiful experience that would be!
The first song sets the wheel in motion / The second is a song of love / The third song tells of Her devotion / The fourth cries joy from the sky above
The fifth song binds our fate to silence / and bids us live each moment well / The sixth unleashes rage and violence / The seventh song has truth to tell
The last song echoes through the ages / to ask its question all night long / And close the circle on these pages / These, the metamythos songs

Caleb Oak

  • Sr. Master Member
  • *******
  • Join Date: Sep 2014
  • Posts: 978
  • Country: nl
  • Total likes: 13
    • View Profile
  • Preferred Pronouns: Male
Quote from: Altair;164715
OK, I just had an epiphany (while washing the dishes, which is when many of my epiphanies happen, oddly enough): I've always considered those two ideas of the moment of death--losing the self to a oneness with the universe, vs. the mind opening up an eternity of imagined time--as either/or, and who really knows.

But what if *both* happen simultaneously?

There's a compelling symmetry for me in that: The totality of everything that is/was/will be pours into an instant, and that same instant expands the wildest dreams of the self to eternity.

What an incomprehensibly beautiful experience that would be!

I have a similar fear of death,  and the idea of losing the self to a oneness with the universe sounds very painful, disgusting and horrifying to me. :o

If you lose your self you are gone.
Just Gone.......

And nothing will matter anymore, because you wont be around to feel, see or sense anything anymore.
Its like having your soul digested i would say...... :confused:

Altair

  • Adept Member
  • ********
  • Join Date: Jul 2011
  • Location: New York, New York
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 3029
  • Country: us
  • Total likes: 401
  • Fly high and make the world follow
    • View Profile
    • Songs of the Metamythos
  • Religion: tree-hugging pagan
  • Preferred Pronouns: he/him/his
Quote from: Thrak;164718
I have a similar fear of death,  and the idea of losing the self to a oneness with the universe sounds very painful, disgusting and horrifying to me. :o

If you lose your self you are gone.
Just Gone.......

And nothing will matter anymore, because you wont be around to feel, see or sense anything anymore.
Its like having your soul digested i would say...... :confused:


I think that's a natural reaction; our sense of self is the only thing throughout our lives we can be sure of. (And also, since that drive to preserve the self is a key to survival, I would imagine it's a response that's evolutionarily hardwired into most self-aware species.)

But what if you expand that concept of self? That's what I find intriguing about "oneness with the universe" (it sounds so hokey, but there it is). That the real self isn't just limited me, and when I die, that veil gets lifted and I get to see the big picture. Sort of like our lives are equivalent to going through the world with really narrow blinders on...and then suddenly the blinders get removed, and you can see so much more.
The first song sets the wheel in motion / The second is a song of love / The third song tells of Her devotion / The fourth cries joy from the sky above
The fifth song binds our fate to silence / and bids us live each moment well / The sixth unleashes rage and violence / The seventh song has truth to tell
The last song echoes through the ages / to ask its question all night long / And close the circle on these pages / These, the metamythos songs

Caleb Oak

  • Sr. Master Member
  • *******
  • Join Date: Sep 2014
  • Posts: 978
  • Country: nl
  • Total likes: 13
    • View Profile
  • Preferred Pronouns: Male
Quote from: Altair;164722
I think that's a natural reaction; our sense of self is the only thing throughout our lives we can be sure of. (And also, since that drive to preserve the self is a key to survival, I would imagine it's a response that's evolutionarily hardwired into most self-aware species.)

But what if you expand that concept of self? That's what I find intriguing about "oneness with the universe" (it sounds so hokey, but there it is). That the real self isn't just limited me, and when I die, that veil gets lifted and I get to see the big picture. Sort of like our lives are equivalent to going through the world with really narrow blinders on...and then suddenly the blinders get removed, and you can see so much more.

The self is your spirit, your soul, ther core of your astral form.

That sounds like Buhdism. *Scared*
Its like saying:''You dont exist, so nothing you do matters''
Iam not a empty shell made of flesh and bone youknow...........

Sarah

  • Sr. Master Member
  • *******
  • Join Date: Apr 2013
  • Posts: 827
  • Total likes: 3
    • View Profile
Quote from: Thrak;164723
The self is your spirit, your soul, ther core of your astral form.

That sounds like Buhdism. *Scared*
Its like saying:''You dont exist, so nothing you do matters''
Iam not a empty shell made of flesh and bone youknow...........

 
But the things we do in this life still exist, still affect things after we have gone even if there is no afterlife. Who you are now  and what you do now is just as important as what happens after death.
Knowing when to use a shovel is what being a witch is all about. Nanny Ogg, Witches Abroad

Caleb Oak

  • Sr. Master Member
  • *******
  • Join Date: Sep 2014
  • Posts: 978
  • Country: nl
  • Total likes: 13
    • View Profile
  • Preferred Pronouns: Male
Quote from: Jake_;164724
But the things we do in this life still exist, still affect things after we have gone even if there is no afterlife. Who you are now  and what you do now is just as important as what happens after death.

 
Only a cruel monster would make the universe like that.
It is the most disgusting, horrifying, degrading thing i can think off.

Plus if there is no afterlife faith has no meaning.......
I am not an atheist after all...........:ashamed:
« Last Edit: November 08, 2014, 12:55:32 pm by Thrak »

Emma Eldritch

  • Staff
  • *
  • Join Date: May 2012
  • Posts: 1265
  • Country: 00
  • Total likes: 68
    • View Profile
    • https://rocknrollwitch.blogspot.ca/
Quote from: Altair;164715
OK, I just had an epiphany (while washing the dishes, which is when many of my epiphanies happen, oddly enough): I've always considered those two ideas of the moment of death--losing the self to a oneness with the universe, vs. the mind opening up an eternity of imagined time--as either/or, and who really knows.

But what if *both* happen simultaneously?

There's a compelling symmetry for me in that: The totality of everything that is/was/will be pours into an instant, and that same instant expands the wildest dreams of the self to eternity.

What an incomprehensibly beautiful experience that would be!

 
That's kind of what I'm hoping for.

I still retain some fear of self annihilation (which sounds like a Mortal Kombat move or something) but that's because I have a very strong ego. I'm really attached to being me.

Part of the reason I keep persisting with meditation is to try and glimpse that universal oneness. When I was younger I actually thought the idea sounded horrible because I'd still lose my sense of self, but the older I get the more I think maybe that the whole enlightenment gig wouldn't be so bad. So I'm hoping to sort of chip away at my ego so it doesn't throw a fit.

Sarah

  • Sr. Master Member
  • *******
  • Join Date: Apr 2013
  • Posts: 827
  • Total likes: 3
    • View Profile
Quote from: Thrak;164725
Only a cruel monster would make the universe like that.
It is the most disgusting, horrifying, degrading thing i can think off.

Plus if there is no afterlife faith has no meaning.......
I am not an atheist after all...........:ashamed:

 
See I don't agree with this, my religious path  helps me live well in the here and now. It's mostly not about what happens after

A lot of the ancestor work I do is carrying on the work my ancestors did to improve my communities so I can pass it on to people who come after me. That is one way I will exist after I am dead
Knowing when to use a shovel is what being a witch is all about. Nanny Ogg, Witches Abroad

Caleb Oak

  • Sr. Master Member
  • *******
  • Join Date: Sep 2014
  • Posts: 978
  • Country: nl
  • Total likes: 13
    • View Profile
  • Preferred Pronouns: Male
Quote from: Jake_;164727
See I don't agree with this, my religious path  helps me live well in the here and now. It's mostly not about what happens after

A lot of the ancestor work I do is carrying on the work my ancestors did to improve my communities so I can pass it on to people who come after me. That is one way I will exist after I am dead

There here and now on this earth is neither dull, or terrefying.

Thats like willfully stepping into the jaws of a monster.
Plus my ancestors where cruel and evil so thats not an option for me.
And i hate my life.......

Tags:
 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
8 Replies
1021 Views
Last post September 08, 2012, 10:15:22 am
by Jabberwocky
8 Replies
1460 Views
Last post July 11, 2013, 10:48:24 am
by Materialist
6 Replies
1766 Views
Last post September 21, 2014, 02:15:26 pm
by carillion
1 Replies
1238 Views
Last post August 30, 2015, 11:42:27 am
by Jenett
8 Replies
498 Views
Last post July 25, 2020, 09:04:14 pm
by ksea

Beginner Area

Warning: You are currently in a Beginner Friendly area of the message board.

* Who's Online

  • Dot Guests: 38
  • Dot Hidden: 0
  • Dot Users: 3
  • Dot Users Online:

* Please Donate!

The Cauldron's server is expensive and requires monthly payments. Please become a Bronze, Silver or Gold Donor if you can. Donations are needed every month. Without member support, we can't afford the server.

* Shop & Support TC

The links below are affiliate links. When you click on one of these links you will go to the listed shopping site with The Cauldron's affiliate code. Any purchases you make during your visit will earn TC a tiny percentage of your purchase price at no extra cost to you.

* In Memoriam

Chavi (2006)
Elspeth (2010)
Marilyn (2013)

* Cauldron Staff

Host:
Sunflower

Message Board Staff
Board Coordinator:
Darkhawk

Assistant Board Coordinator:
Aster Breo

Senior Staff:
Aisling, Jenett, Sefiru

Staff:
Allaya, Chatelaine, EclecticWheel, HarpingHawke, Kylara, PerditaPickle, rocquelaire

Discord Chat Staff
Chat Coordinator:
Morag

Cauldron Council:
Bob, Catja, Emma-Eldritch, Fausta, Jubes, Kelly, LyricFox, Phouka, Sperran, Star, Steve, Tana

Site Administrator:
Randall