collapse

* "Unable to verify referring url. Please go back and try again" Problem Logging In?

If you get an "Unable to verify referring url. Please go back and try again" error when you try to log in, you need to be sure you are accessing the board with a url that starts with "https://ecauldron.com".  If it starts with https://www.ecauldron.com" (or "http://www.ecauldron.com") you will get this error because "www.ecauldron.com" is not technically the same website as "ecauldron.com". Moving to the more secure "https" means it is more picky about such things.

Author Topic: Korean dramas and culture  (Read 3520 times)

zamotcr

  • Sr. Apprentice
  • ****
  • Join Date: Oct 2013
  • Posts: 65
  • Total likes: 0
    • View Profile
    • http://www.zamot.pw
Korean dramas and culture
« Reply #30 on: January 18, 2014, 04:43:42 pm »
Quote from: stephyjh;136865
The appropriation that is taking place is of African-American culture.

Yes, but dreads are not exclusive of afro-americans. In my country as I said, there is an afro-caribbean province which do have white and black people using dreads, cooking the same food, using the same cloths, playing and singing the same music and songs. I do have several friends that born in that province and the only difference between him and a people of color is the skin color. And he definitely is not appropriating anything! He was raised there. That he could have better opportunities? Perhaps, but that does not exclude him from his culture which is Afro-Caribbean even when he is white :p

Well, k-pop perse is not appropriating, is not the genre fault, that is a generalization. The appropriation is only for some groups, not the whole scene. Others genres do the same, but we can't said it's the while scene. It's like saying all people who listen metal or rock are satanic, sounds familiar isn't it?
« Last Edit: January 18, 2014, 04:46:20 pm by zamotcr »

zamotcr

  • Sr. Apprentice
  • ****
  • Join Date: Oct 2013
  • Posts: 65
  • Total likes: 0
    • View Profile
    • http://www.zamot.pw
Korean dramas and culture
« Reply #31 on: January 18, 2014, 04:45:06 pm »
Quote from: Caffeinated Autumn;136866
My mum is totally into Korean dramas. Me and her use to watch them together all the time. I remember one time when I was younger,  she had to go to the hospital for surgery and she told me to watch the latest episodes for her so when I visited her I could tell her what happened x3

My favorite K-drama is Coffee Prince! And I listen to some of the older Korean groups/singers from when I was younger like, S.E.S, Coyote, BoA...etc.

I've been really getting into Korean food too. I can't have enough of it! And this is from someone who's been a major Japanophile for a looong time!

P.S. Why is there a discussion about African-American culture when we are suppose to be chatting about what we like about Korean culture??

I'm in the same boat as you yay :)

I have to see Coffee Prince :)

kiarakapow

  • Apprentice
  • ***
  • Join Date: Jan 2014
  • Posts: 34
  • Total likes: 0
    • View Profile
Re: Korean dramas and culture
« Reply #32 on: January 18, 2014, 04:49:46 pm »
Quote from: zamotcr;136852
So its KPOP or just few bands? Because I'm pretty sure that cultural appropriation happens in every music style.

Shouldn't jazz or blues be played only by people of color?

Cultural appropriation does happen in every music style however, this thread was about Korean dramas/KPOP/culture. If you'd like to discuss the appropriation in other music styles we can but you might want to start a different thread for that.

Also, when I referenced black/Latino culture, I should have been more clear in my explanation. What I should have said was African American and Latino American/Hispanic culture.

So let's break this down so we can all understand.

1. Cultural appropriation is the stealing of different aspects of a culture.
2. Cultural appropriation is tied with oppression, racism, privileged and dehumanization.
3. Minority groups can appropriate from other minority groups as well as dominant groups appropriating from minority groups.
4. Cultural appropriation is inherently negative. There is absolutely nothing positive about someone stealing aspect of your culture with no regard to it's history or meaning.
5. Appropriation is not the same as exchanging cultures or being influenced by other cultures.
6. Cultural appropriation is harmful.

When someone is apart of a culture(me, who is apart of both Latino American and African American culture) that is being appropriated and they call out the offenders(ie KPOP stars) out on that appropriation, it shouldn't be argued with. We shouldn't have to justify why it's appropriation. People outside that culture shouldn't try to explain it as culture sharing or globalization because it's not. Appropriation is disgusting and disrespectful. At the same time, I'm not bashing KPOP or boycotting it. I do like KPOP. Which is the entire reason I first reply to this thread. However, just because you like something doesn't mean you can't point out the harmful aspects of it.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2014, 04:51:06 pm by kiarakapow »

stephyjh

  • Grand Master Member
  • *******
  • Join Date: Jul 2011
  • Posts: 1597
  • Total likes: 2
    • View Profile
Korean dramas and culture
« Reply #33 on: January 18, 2014, 05:20:26 pm »
Quote from: kiarakapow;136880
Cultural appropriation does happen in every music style however, this thread was about Korean dramas/KPOP/culture. If you'd like to discuss the appropriation in other music styles we can but you might want to start a different thread for that.

Also, when I referenced black/Latino culture, I should have been more clear in my explanation. What I should have said was African American and Latino American/Hispanic culture.

So let's break this down so we can all understand.

1. Cultural appropriation is the stealing of different aspects of a culture.
2. Cultural appropriation is tied with oppression, racism, privileged and dehumanization.
3. Minority groups can appropriate from other minority groups as well as dominant groups appropriating from minority groups.
4. Cultural appropriation is inherently negative. There is absolutely nothing positive about someone stealing aspect of your culture with no regard to it's history or meaning.
5. Appropriation is not the same as exchanging cultures or being influenced by other cultures.
6. Cultural appropriation is harmful.

When someone is apart of a culture(me, who is apart of both Latino American and African American culture) that is being appropriated and they call out the offenders(ie KPOP stars) out on that appropriation, it shouldn't be argued with. We shouldn't have to justify why it's appropriation. People outside that culture shouldn't try to explain it as culture sharing or globalization because it's not. Appropriation is disgusting and disrespectful. At the same time, I'm not bashing KPOP or boycotting it. I do like KPOP. Which is the entire reason I first reply to this thread. However, just because you like something doesn't mean you can't point out the harmful aspects of it.

http://www.socialjusticeleague.net/2011/09/how-to-be-a-fan-of-problematic-things/ seems relevant.
A heretic blast has been blown in the west,
That what is no sense must be nonsense.

-Robert Burns

kiarakapow

  • Apprentice
  • ***
  • Join Date: Jan 2014
  • Posts: 34
  • Total likes: 0
    • View Profile
Re: Korean dramas and culture
« Reply #34 on: January 18, 2014, 05:36:54 pm »
Quote from: stephyjh;136883
http://www.socialjusticeleague.net/2011/09/how-to-be-a-fan-of-problematic-things/ seems relevant.

 
Very relevant. I have seen it before but couldn't find the link for it. Thanks

zamotcr

  • Sr. Apprentice
  • ****
  • Join Date: Oct 2013
  • Posts: 65
  • Total likes: 0
    • View Profile
    • http://www.zamot.pw
Korean dramas and culture
« Reply #35 on: January 18, 2014, 08:12:57 pm »
Quote from: kiarakapow;136884

Reading from Wikipedia, dreads are not tied to Afro-American.

Look this extract:

" Dreadlocks are associated most closely with the Rastafari movement, but people from many ethnic groups have worn dreadlocks, including many ancient Hamitic people of North Africa and East Africa (notably the Oromo of Ethiopia, and the Maasai of northern Kenya); Semitic people of West Asia; Indo-European people of Europe and South Asia (notably the ancient Spartan warriors of Greece, and the Sadhus of India and Nepal); Turkic people of Anatolia and Central Asia; the Sufi Rafaees; and the Sufi malangs and fakirs of Pakistan."

Otherwise we should not be using suits because they are not american lol

Of course denigrating anyone is bad bad bad. If I see any disrespectful artist I wouldn't watch or hear them anymore.

If I see a Korean with dreads because they are "rastas" or chant reggae I would not mind. Also I don't have any problem if they chant reggae. I don't see it disrespectful the same way as I don't see disrespectful a white playing jazz or blues.

But if I see a Korean with the face painted black imitating a PoC, I definitely would stop listening them.

They may or may not use items of other cultures, I think depends on the lyrics and the context. If the song is talking about a native american but not in a disrespectful way, I would not be offended. Depends in the context.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2014, 03:26:32 am by Chabas »

kiarakapow

  • Apprentice
  • ***
  • Join Date: Jan 2014
  • Posts: 34
  • Total likes: 0
    • View Profile
Re: Korean dramas and culture
« Reply #36 on: January 18, 2014, 10:01:16 pm »
Quote from: zamotcr;136892
Reading from Wikipedia, dreads are not tied to Afro-American.

Look this extract:

" Dreadlocks are associated most closely with the Rastafari movement, but people from many ethnic groups have worn dreadlocks, including many ancient Hamitic people of North Africa and East Africa (notably the Oromo of Ethiopia, and the Maasai of northern Kenya); Semitic people of West Asia; Indo-European people of Europe and South Asia (notably the ancient Spartan warriors of Greece, and the Sadhus of India and Nepal); Turkic people of Anatolia and Central Asia; the Sufi Rafaees; and the Sufi malangs and fakirs of Pakistan."

Otherwise we should not be using suits because they are not american lol

Of course denigrating anyone is bad bad bad. If I see any disrespectful artist I wouldn't watch or hear them anymore.

If I see a Korean with dreads because they are "rastas" or chant reggae I would not mind. Also I don't have any problem if they chant reggae. I don't see it disrespectful the same way as I don't see disrespectful a white playing jazz or blues.

But if I see a Korean with the face painted black imitating a PoC, I definitely would stop listening them.

They may or may not use items of other cultures, I think depends on the lyrics and the context. If the song is talking about a native american but not in a disrespectful way, I would not be offended. Depends in the context.

 
You are strangely fixated on one aspect of the many that I described as appropriation in KPOP.

But you're right. Dreads are in fact seen in other cultures. However, every single one of those cultures have a reason why they use dreadlocks as a hairstyle. So since we're using Wikipedia, let's look at some of the significance of wearing dreads in these different cultures.

This is, of course, just some of the different regions that use dreadlocks that Wikipedia covers:
"Africa and the Western World; Caribbean, North and South America

Africans and people of African descent are known to wear this hairstyle. Members of various African ethnic groups wear locks and the styles and significance may change from one group to another.

Maasai warriors are famous for their long, thin, red locks. Many people dye their hair red with root extracts or red ochre. In various cultures what are known as shamans, spiritual men or women who serve and speak to spirits or deities, often wear locks. In Nigeria, the Yoruba priests of Olokun, the Orisha of the deep ocean, wear locks. Another group is the Turkana people of Kenya.

Locks on a Rastafari's head are symbolic of the Lion of Judah which is sometimes centered on the Ethiopian flag. Rastafari hold that Haile Selassie is a direct descendant of King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba, through their son Menelik I."

"Hinduism

Similarly, among some Sadhus and Sadhvis, Hindu holy men and women, locks are sacred, considered to be a religious practice, an expression of disregard for profane vanity.....

.....Locks in South Asia are reserved nearly exclusively for holy people. According to the 'Hymn of the longhaired sage' in the ancient Vedas, long jatas express a spiritual significance which implies the wearer has special relations with spirits, is an immortal traveler between two worlds and the master over fire......

.....The Shaiva Nagas, ascetics of South Asia, wear their jatas in a twisted knot or bundle on top of the head and let them down only for special occasions and rituals. The strands are then rubbed with ashes and cow dung, considered both sacred and purifying, then scented and adorned with flowers."

"Buddhism

Within Tibetan Buddhism and other more esoteric forms of Buddhism, dreadlocks have occasionally been substituted for the more traditional shaved head. The most recognizable of these groups are knowns as the Ngagpas of Tibet. For many practicing Buddhists, dreadlocks are a way to let go of material vanity and excessive attachments."

As you can see, these people outside of America consider dreads as something significant to their culture. Most has deep roots in their religion. And I'm sure if you go through other cultures with dreads it would be the same way.

The problem with using dreads as a Korean is not because they are Korean but because they are using it as simply a look. Something they can take off. A COSTUME. That is the problem. I don't care if a random Korean person does identify as Rasta and has dreads, as long as they truly are Rasta. I care that multiple KPOP stars, who don't identify as Rasta, wear dreads as a costume and then go and spew a whole load of racism in front of millions of people.

Also trivializing the appropriation of someone's culture to people wearing suits is extremely rude, disrespectful, and a giant indicator that you still haven't realized exactly what cultural appropriation is.

And again, just because you personally aren't offended by appropriation doesn't mean others aren't.

 *I wasn't sure if we were allowed to bold text(or use BB codes in general) in posts so I apologize if we aren't.
**I had to shorten the quotes but they were found in the Wiki page about dreadlocks.

Tags:
 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
70 Replies
11723 Views
Last post July 30, 2011, 01:59:36 pm
by Juniperberry
0 Replies
1103 Views
Last post September 13, 2012, 09:39:26 am
by Jabberwocky
23 Replies
2555 Views
Last post March 28, 2013, 05:48:46 pm
by Phi92
4 Replies
1398 Views
Last post November 04, 2015, 06:07:10 pm
by Hyacinth Belle
5 Replies
2441 Views
Last post December 31, 2015, 06:45:16 pm
by Floofy Bunny

* Who's Online

  • Dot Guests: 43
  • Dot Hidden: 0
  • Dot Users: 1
  • Dot Users Online:

* Please Donate!

The Cauldron's server is expensive and requires monthly payments. Please become a Bronze, Silver or Gold Donor if you can. Donations are needed every month. Without member support, we can't afford the server.

* Shop & Support TC

The links below are affiliate links. When you click on one of these links you will go to the listed shopping site with The Cauldron's affiliate code. Any purchases you make during your visit will earn TC a tiny percentage of your purchase price at no extra cost to you.

* In Memoriam

Chavi (2006)
Elspeth (2010)
Marilyn (2013)

* Cauldron Staff

Host:
Sunflower

Message Board Staff
Board Coordinator:
Darkhawk

Assistant Board Coordinator:
Aster Breo

Senior Staff:
Aisling, Jenett, Sefiru

Staff:
Allaya, Chatelaine, EclecticWheel, HarpingHawke, Kylara, PerditaPickle, rocquelaire

Discord Chat Staff
Chat Coordinator:
Morag

Cauldron Council:
Bob, Catja, Emma-Eldritch, Fausta, Jubes, Kelly, LyricFox, Phouka, Sperran, Star, Steve, Tana

Site Administrator:
Randall