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Author Topic: Pathworking/Guided Mediations  (Read 2409 times)

addy

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Pathworking/Guided Mediations
« on: August 29, 2011, 04:56:37 pm »
Hey guys :) I was wondering, how do you guys write pathworkings/Guided mediations? or do you get them online or from books? and if you write your own, what do you write yours on? Thanks :) Blessed be

SkySamuelle

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Re: Pathworking/Guided Mediations
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2011, 05:27:17 pm »
Quote from: addy;16394
Hey guys :) I was wondering, how do you guys write pathworkings/Guided mediations? or do you get them online or from books? and if you write your own, what do you write yours on? Thanks :) Blessed be

 
I think it's best to start from professional exemple.

Trance-Portation by Diana Paxton is an excellent beginner guide for this.

Also Magical Meditations by Yasmine Galenorn :

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/462354.Magical_Meditations

it has appropiate guided meditations for every wiccan sabbath.
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addy

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Re: Pathworking/Guided Mediations
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2011, 05:34:51 pm »
Quote from: SkySamuelle;16400
I think it's best to start from professional exemple.

Trance-Portation by Diana Paxton is an excellent beginner guide for this.

Also Magical Meditations by Yasmine Galenorn :

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/462354.Magical_Meditations

it has appropiate guided meditations for every wiccan sabbath.

 
Yup I have the magical mediation by yasmine galenorn. I just founf the recording being a hassle because I would have to wait for pauses and my tension span with reading is very low. mediating is fine though :) are there other ways then just recording it?

SkySamuelle

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Re: Pathworking/Guided Mediations
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2011, 06:03:26 pm »
Quote from: addy;16403
Yup I have the magical mediation by yasmine galenorn. I just founf the recording being a hassle because I would have to wait for pauses and my tension span with reading is very low. mediating is fine though :) are there other ways then just recording it?

 
I never do well with recording - i get distracted i don't visualize as well as i do when i simply memorize the meditation.

That's what I do - I memorize the general scheme as precisely as possible, and then I take notice of what changed.
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addy

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Re: Pathworking/Guided Mediations
« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2011, 06:07:23 pm »
Quote from: SkySamuelle;16412
I never do well with recording - i get distracted i don't visualize as well as i do when i simply memorize the meditation.

That's what I do - I memorize the general scheme as precisely as possible, and then I take notice of what changed.

 
okies :) Thanks, So I should read it out for a good half hour then wait little then do the mediation . Thanks :)

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Re: Pathworking/Guided Mediations
« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2011, 06:29:36 pm »
Quote from: addy;16394
Hey guys :) I was wondering, how do you guys write pathworkings/Guided mediations? or do you get them online or from books? and if you write your own, what do you write yours on? Thanks :) Blessed be

 
If you want to listen to a full guided meditation, then yeah, you pretty much have to find what you're interested in and record it. (Thankfully, this is a lot easier than it was when I started, since most computers have a relatively simple way to do the recording these days.)

There's a couple of different approaches (and this is one of the places where some people use guided meditation for one approach, and pathworking for another - which I tend to, too.)

Guided meditation:

For a full narrative - go here, talk to X, have Y thing happen - I write them out and record them. This is what I refer to as a guided meditation: you are being guided through the 'story' of the meditation pretty directly, though there can and should be places where you have your own experiences.

Generally, these have some sort of defined goal - you know when you're done whether you've achieved it or not.

I have an example up at http://gleewood.org/seeking/practices/visualisation/ (it's the second half of the page, beginning at "A garden meditation"). This is one I wrote for group ritual use about 8 years ago now. (It's not the best meditation I've ever written, but it works well for people reliably, so.)

The goal in that case was "help people clear out stuff that's no longer serving them, in a way that draws their attention to not only what they care about, but how they're going about it." I also wanted to create a meditation that did a better job with a wide variety of sensory inputs, not just visual ones. (Visual input has always been the hardest one for me in meditation, though after a number of years of practice, it's gotten a lot more reliable.)

So, the 'story' of the meditation does things that lead to those goals: walking down a path, discovering an abandoned garden, having some things to spark ideas about what someone might want to make active again in their lives, some gentle cleaning and clearing, and then a return to the waking world. Because it was designed as a spring ritual in a group where our students began in January (so most of the students wouldn't have great skills in meditation yet), it's relatively short, relatively concrete, and it has lots of things someone without a lot of experience can use as an anchor point if they lose concentration (repeated phrases, clear transitions, etc.)

I like Yasmine Galenorn's meditations, for pre-written ones (she's also got a book of Tarot based ones), though I also get them from other sources. My tradition has a series of three that are core to part of our training process: those were written by people within the tradition, based on shared communal meditation experiences of the primary teachers. (So, basically, the meditation guides future students through a specific experience those people shared and described together.)

Definitely put some time between recording it and listening - I've found a couple of days is my bare minimum (otherwise, my brain jumps ahead to what I know is coming), and a couple of weeks is actually better. (Of course, this takes some advance planning, but is pretty easy if you know you want to work through a series of meditations, or that you want to do something for X ritual in a couple of weeks.)

If you don't like how you sound recording it (a lot of people don't like the sound of their own voice on recording - that's because what it sounds like inside our head, with bone conduction and some fascinating acoustics science - is not what it sounds like outside our head.)

Anyway, if you don't like your own voice, making a deal with a friend to record it can work really well. I know some people who use text-to-speech software for something similar, though personally, the occasional mangled words the software manages throw me out of meditation pretty hard.

If you really don't like any of those options, then remembering a general guide, but treating it more as a pathworking, below, is also an option.

Pathworking
This is the term I use for broader, more open-ended work which has less of a formal story arc, or that is simple open-ended ("go meet this deity" could go a lot of places.)

The way I do these is that I have some kind of general aim ("I would like to spend some time getting to know about X deity/entity/whatever") and I walk myself through a general induction and scene-setting thing (that I usually plan in some detail, or at least use something that's well known to me.) But once I'm solidly there, I go off and do the whatever, and see what happens.

This is a bit more complicated, in several ways - because you don't have the anchors, you don't really have a time when you're done. You don't have the clear-cut "we're walking back towards ordinary consciousness" stuff. You don't have an arc of what's happening. It's sort of like being in a very vivid dream: awesome stuff can happen, and you can come out of it with amazing inspiration and insight. But you can also find yourself feeling a bit overwhelmed, not in control of what's going on, and spinning your wheels trying to figure out how to cope.

This is therefore not a method I suggest to people who don't already have a good sense of centering, grounding, and basic visualisation skills (Diana Paxson's _Trance-Portation_ is my favorite current intro to that kind of thing). And for people who have previous experience getting stuck in meditation or dreams, it's something I'd suggest doing when a friend or family member is around (just in case you feel woogly when you're done and need help with a glass of water or some food), and at some point when you don't need to drive in the next hour or two.

You can build in some things to help - for example, maybe you have a very simple arc of "I want to go pay my respects to WhateverDeity, and then offer them something as a thank you, and then turn around and go back to where I started from."

One I use fairly regularly is what I refer to as the Great Library meditation: I go into the Great Library (which looks one way for me, and entirely different for other people - or in other sections, for that matter) and I do some stuff, and I divine for answers to questions a bit. And then when I've gotten my info for that visit's questions, I generally wander off home. (Actually, I sometimes do other stuff, but that's because I'm a library geek, and it spills over into this meditation for me: I have an office in there. But for most people I've done it with, it's go in, find some info that nudges you along more paths for finding what you're looking for, go home.)

However, it's really open-ended: people may see very different things in that library context, meet with different beings, get different kinds of feedback, etc. It's just got a very strong setting context to anchor it.

This is also how I do a lot of my personal astral space work: I have a very clear physical introduction (walking along a particular path, or opening the door to a specific space that's well-known to me), and then I go do whatever I'm doing there, and when I'm done, I wander off home. Having the experience be useful to me, however, means I still need to know what my basic goal is. Sometimes that's "Hang out in this space for a bit." Sometimes it's more about achieving a specific goal/project/result.

Anyway, in all of these, I don't pre-record them, but I do spend some time figuring out what induction method fits my overall goals (and mood for the day), what my basic goal for the work is, and anything else that might affect what I'm doing.

Have I eaten recently? Am I feeling healthy? Do I want to take notes while in trance state? (I have a knack for doing this with my eyes closed: I can write more or less legibly, sketch things like a general layout of a space, etc. I don't do it all the time, but there are meditations where it's quite handy.) Do I have sufficient time? (I'm more likely to use a guided meditation if I'm not sure, as my pathworkings sometimes run really condensed and brief, and sometimes take ages and ages.)

Other notes:
I find it really helpful to have quiet instrumental music playing as a way to filter noise from other things around me (car driving down the road, people moving in nearby apartments, etc.) A fan can work well, too, but I find the music's even better, if I've got something that's a good fit for the goal of my working.

You can also use music as a gentle timer - set up however many minutes of music you want the meditation time to be, work your way back out of the meditation when the music stops. Much less jarring than an alarm clock.
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addy

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Re: Pathworking/Guided Mediations
« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2011, 07:59:16 pm »
Quote from: Jenett;16423
If you want to listen to a full guided meditation, then yeah, you pretty much have to find what you're interested in and record it. (Thankfully, this is a lot easier than it was when I started, since most computers have a relatively simple way to do the recording these days.)

There's a couple of different approaches (and this is one of the places where some people use guided meditation for one approach, and pathworking for another - which I tend to, too.)

Guided meditation:

For a full narrative - go here, talk to X, have Y thing happen - I write them out and record them. This is what I refer to as a guided meditation: you are being guided through the 'story' of the meditation pretty directly, though there can and should be places where you have your own experiences.

Generally, these have some sort of defined goal - you know when you're done whether you've achieved it or not.

I have an example up at http://gleewood.org/seeking/practices/visualisation/ (it's the second half of the page, beginning at "A garden meditation"). This is one I wrote for group ritual use about 8 years ago now. (It's not the best meditation I've ever written, but it works well for people reliably, so.)

The goal in that case was "help people clear out stuff that's no longer serving them, in a way that draws their attention to not only what they care about, but how they're going about it." I also wanted to create a meditation that did a better job with a wide variety of sensory inputs, not just visual ones. (Visual input has always been the hardest one for me in meditation, though after a number of years of practice, it's gotten a lot more reliable.)

So, the 'story' of the meditation does things that lead to those goals: walking down a path, discovering an abandoned garden, having some things to spark ideas about what someone might want to make active again in their lives, some gentle cleaning and clearing, and then a return to the waking world. Because it was designed as a spring ritual in a group where our students began in January (so most of the students wouldn't have great skills in meditation yet), it's relatively short, relatively concrete, and it has lots of things someone without a lot of experience can use as an anchor point if they lose concentration (repeated phrases, clear transitions, etc.)

I like Yasmine Galenorn's meditations, for pre-written ones (she's also got a book of Tarot based ones), though I also get them from other sources. My tradition has a series of three that are core to part of our training process: those were written by people within the tradition, based on shared communal meditation experiences of the primary teachers. (So, basically, the meditation guides future students through a specific experience those people shared and described together.)

Definitely put some time between recording it and listening - I've found a couple of days is my bare minimum (otherwise, my brain jumps ahead to what I know is coming), and a couple of weeks is actually better. (Of course, this takes some advance planning, but is pretty easy if you know you want to work through a series of meditations, or that you want to do something for X ritual in a couple of weeks.)

If you don't like how you sound recording it (a lot of people don't like the sound of their own voice on recording - that's because what it sounds like inside our head, with bone conduction and some fascinating acoustics science - is not what it sounds like outside our head.)

Anyway, if you don't like your own voice, making a deal with a friend to record it can work really well. I know some people who use text-to-speech software for something similar, though personally, the occasional mangled words the software manages throw me out of meditation pretty hard.

If you really don't like any of those options, then remembering a general guide, but treating it more as a pathworking, below, is also an option.

Pathworking
This is the term I use for broader, more open-ended work which has less of a formal story arc, or that is simple open-ended ("go meet this deity" could go a lot of places.)

The way I do these is that I have some kind of general aim ("I would like to spend some time getting to know about X deity/entity/whatever") and I walk myself through a general induction and scene-setting thing (that I usually plan in some detail, or at least use something that's well known to me.) But once I'm solidly there, I go off and do the whatever, and see what happens.

This is a bit more complicated, in several ways - because you don't have the anchors, you don't really have a time when you're done. You don't have the clear-cut "we're walking back towards ordinary consciousness" stuff. You don't have an arc of what's happening. It's sort of like being in a very vivid dream: awesome stuff can happen, and you can come out of it with amazing inspiration and insight. But you can also find yourself feeling a bit overwhelmed, not in control of what's going on, and spinning your wheels trying to figure out how to cope.

This is therefore not a method I suggest to people who don't already have a good sense of centering, grounding, and basic visualisation skills (Diana Paxson's _Trance-Portation_ is my favorite current intro to that kind of thing). And for people who have previous experience getting stuck in meditation or dreams, it's something I'd suggest doing when a friend or family member is around (just in case you feel woogly when you're done and need help with a glass of water or some food), and at some point when you don't need to drive in the next hour or two.

You can build in some things to help - for example, maybe you have a very simple arc of "I want to go pay my respects to WhateverDeity, and then offer them something as a thank you, and then turn around and go back to where I started from."

One I use fairly regularly is what I refer to as the Great Library meditation: I go into the Great Library (which looks one way for me, and entirely different for other people - or in other sections, for that matter) and I do some stuff, and I divine for answers to questions a bit. And then when I've gotten my info for that visit's questions, I generally wander off home. (Actually, I sometimes do other stuff, but that's because I'm a library geek, and it spills over into this meditation for me: I have an office in there. But for most people I've done it with, it's go in, find some info that nudges you along more paths for finding what you're looking for, go home.)

However, it's really open-ended: people may see very different things in that library context, meet with different beings, get different kinds of feedback, etc. It's just got a very strong setting context to anchor it.

This is also how I do a lot of my personal astral space work: I have a very clear physical introduction (walking along a particular path, or opening the door to a specific space that's well-known to me), and then I go do whatever I'm doing there, and when I'm done, I wander off home. Having the experience be useful to me, however, means I still need to know what my basic goal is. Sometimes that's "Hang out in this space for a bit." Sometimes it's more about achieving a specific goal/project/result.

Anyway, in all of these, I don't pre-record them, but I do spend some time figuring out what induction method fits my overall goals (and mood for the day), what my basic goal for the work is, and anything else that might affect what I'm doing.

Have I eaten recently? Am I feeling healthy? Do I want to take notes while in trance state? (I have a knack for doing this with my eyes closed: I can write more or less legibly, sketch things like a general layout of a space, etc. I don't do it all the time, but there are meditations where it's quite handy.) Do I have sufficient time? (I'm more likely to use a guided meditation if I'm not sure, as my pathworkings sometimes run really condensed and brief, and sometimes take ages and ages.)

Other notes:
I find it really helpful to have quiet instrumental music playing as a way to filter noise from other things around me (car driving down the road, people moving in nearby apartments, etc.) A fan can work well, too, but I find the music's even better, if I've got something that's a good fit for the goal of my working.

You can also use music as a gentle timer - set up however many minutes of music you want the meditation time to be, work your way back out of the meditation when the music stops. Much less jarring than an alarm clock.

Thank you!!!! :) I prefer Pathworking because when I listen to a voice it messes me up. so with pathworking like you said I do this: Go down a path or open a door, then do what I need to do, then get out the same way I enterd. sometimes I may get worried of getting lost so I heard if you tie a rope around your arm and around a tree from where you start (or lamp post if its library like you said) then Ill do that. Thank you! :) Blessed be
« Last Edit: August 29, 2011, 08:00:11 pm by addy »

Marilyn/Absentminded

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Re: Pathworking/Guided Mediations
« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2011, 09:41:51 pm »
Quote from: addy;16445



Addy,

There is no need to include the entire quote in your answer, especially one as long and thorough as Jennet's usually are.  All we really need is the linkback so you can trim away most, or even all of the quote when you are making your reply.

If you are trimming the entire quote just remember to leave the opening quote code and the closing quote code on separate lines so that the linkback still shows up.

This isn't any kind of warning, and you haven't broken any rules.  Consider it more along the lines of 'helpful hints' for posting at TC.

Thanks,
Marilyn, TC Staff
I smile when I\'m angry.  I cheat and I lie
I do what I have to do to get by
But I know what is wrong, and I know what is right
And I die for the truth in my secret life

   In My Secret Life, L. Cohen

diana_rajchel

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Re: Pathworking/Guided Mediations
« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2011, 10:04:57 pm »
Quote from: SkySamuelle;16400
I think it's best to start from professional exemple.

Trance-Portation by Diana Paxton is an excellent beginner guide for this.



YES to Trance-Portation. I consider it one of the best I've ever read on the subject. I've also used some of Starhawk's in Spiral Dance as a jumping off point, but over time I've started writing more of my own to address specific emotional challenges and journeys.

addy

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Re: Pathworking/Guided Mediations
« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2011, 11:27:33 pm »
Quote from: Marilyn/Absentminded;16476
Addy,

 
Oh okies xD lolol I was wondering what I was doing wrong xD thanks for the heads up

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