collapse

* "Unable to verify referring url. Please go back and try again" Problem Logging In?

If you get an "Unable to verify referring url. Please go back and try again" error when you try to log in, you need to be sure you are accessing the board with a url that starts with "https://ecauldron.com".  If it starts with https://www.ecauldron.com" (or "http://www.ecauldron.com") you will get this error because "www.ecauldron.com" is not technically the same website as "ecauldron.com". Moving to the more secure "https" means it is more picky about such things.

Author Topic: On the Numinosity of the Gods  (Read 1519 times)

EclecticWheel

  • Staff
  • *
  • Join Date: Jul 2013
  • Location: Texas
  • Posts: 671
  • Country: us
  • Total likes: 160
    • View Profile
  • Religion: Re-evaluating/ Star & Marian Rites, Agnostic with faith
  • Preferred Pronouns: he/him/his
On the Numinosity of the Gods
« on: April 04, 2019, 11:25:42 pm »
I've come across some discussions on some neo-pagan forums in which some describe the gods as "archetypes" and simultaneously as "not real."  Not so much around here in which a significant number of people self-identify as hard polytheists, but in some quarters I hear this kind of thinking.

From what I can ascertain of Jungian thought, and admittedly I'm still wrapping my mind around that complicated topic, this is not how Jung would have viewed the archetypes -- as "not real."  They still contain a numinous quality at least as far as the conscious mind is concerned.  Experientially they are external.  They can "happen to us."  They can interact with us in transformative and significant ways.

I acknowledge my agnosticism about many topics including the nature of the gods, miracles, the afterlife, and other topics.  I am also agnostic as to some aspects of Jungian theory, though I strongly suspect there is some truth in it at least in part.  Furthermore Jungian theories are ongoing in development and did not end with the death of Carl Jung.  They can be tweaked.

However, based on personal encounters I have little doubt about the numinosity of the gods or the spirits at least as far as experience is concerned.  By "numinous" I mean that there is an external and mysterious component to the gods, that we cannot fully uncover this mystery and that we can at times encounter the gods as if from without.

In terms of justifying my religious practices the bottom line is that they make me happy, and I flourish through them.  They give my life meaning.  They embody the seeking aspect of my human psychology, and there is a principle I follow in deciding on to whom and how I express devotion: "Thou shalt have no other gods before thine own well being nor worship them in any manner that is not conducive to that well being."

In terms of the intellect I arrive at certain conclusions through experience.  One of the Powers I am devoted to is my Little Rabbit who has associations with Tu'er Shen, the white rabbit from Alice and Wonderland, and the rabbit from The Little Rabbit Who Wanted Red Wings, a book that made a powerful impression on me the first time it was read to me in childhood.  Though I didn't know to whom I was reaching out to the creative process of compiling associations and symbolism that I needed in a spirit was conscious.  I derived that from the prior sources I listed.

The rest of the process was unconscious -- dreams and dream-like waking encounters took over from there, and though the entity did embody the associations I consciously compiled, he also took on unexpected qualities and a life of his own.  This is the numinous quality.  I have had other encounters that were similarly from external sources "happening to me" so far as experience is concerned.

Therefore when Christians and neo-pagans and others describe having visions and other powerful encounters with the gods I tend to believe that at least some of these reported experiences are sincere and that they embody similar qualities as my own experiences.

In some neo-pagan and other spaces in which these types of encounters might be reported by some as a daily or common event I get skeptical, but I have no reason to doubt that sometimes these things happen to people.  They are reported across time and space, and I report them too, and of my own experiences I can be as certain as of anything.

I can only speculate as to how much we can learn about the gods is humanly constructed and how much is of a numinous quality.  I suspect that there are both components present within them and that both pantheons and even Yahweh are at least in part humanity "writ large," thus my arrival at the interpretation that "Thou shalt have no other gods before me," boils down to "Thou shalt have no other gods before thine own well being."

So those are my thoughts on these matters and how I justify myself as a religious agnostic.  There are two principles involved in deciding my religious practices: what is conducive to my flourishing and what I can ascertain about gods and/or spirits through both experience and reasoning.

If you work with gods or other Powers do you believe they have a numinous, external quality?

Do you have any thoughts that pertain to how you reconcile tensions between uncertainty and commitments to certain belief structures or assumptions?

Thanks again for reading!
My personal moral code:

Love wisely, and do what thou wilt.

ehbowen

  • Grand Master Member
  • *******
  • Join Date: Jul 2011
  • Location: Houston, Texas
  • *
  • Posts: 1211
  • Country: us
  • Total likes: 216
  • A Ways Around the Bend...
    • View Profile
    • Streamliner Schedules
  • Religion: Southern Baptist
Re: On the Numinosity of the Gods
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2019, 11:07:20 am »
I can only speculate as to how much we can learn about the gods is humanly constructed and how much is of a numinous quality.  I suspect that there are both components present within them and that both pantheons and even Yahweh are at least in part humanity "writ large," thus my arrival at the interpretation that "Thou shalt have no other gods before me," boils down to "Thou shalt have no other gods before thine own well being."

But it's explicitly stated in Jewish/Christian Scripture that man IS Jehovah, writ small: "So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them (Genesis 1:27, KJV)." So it should be no surprise that we have many commonalities.

And more so than you might think. Yes, I'm not downplaying the numinous aspects of my God, "...dwelling in unapproachable light, whom no man has seen or can see... (1 Timothy 6:16b, NKJV)." But the Person of the Godhead about whom Paul was writing had just very recently spent thirty-three years living among men as a man, many of Paul's acquaintances had spent significant time with Him, and Paul himself had received a glimpse through that "unapproachable light" on at least one occasion. So, approachable human, or unapproachable numinous light?

Those of you who know me will probably not be surprised to hear my answer: Both/And. I believe that the Godhead of the Bible is, even now, striving to truly identify with us and understand life from our perspective. I think it quite likely that all ten of them are living among us incognito, supporting themselves only with honest labor...no cheating...and trying to truly appreciate the problems and the challenges we face. There are quite a few of us who will someday, I feel, be very surprised to find out who their next door neighbor really was!

And yet, at the same time, there is a numinous mystery that perhaps none of us will ever truly understand...although perhaps we might hope to approach it asymptotically. I do in fact expect to some day have as intimate a relationship with a Person of the Godhead as is possible...but I expect that, even thousands of years from now, I'll still be discovering (and enjoying!) new aspects of her personality and being.

I look forward to that.
--------Eric H. Bowen
Where's the KABOOM? There was supposed to have been an Earth-shattering KABOOM!

Eastling

  • Sr. Master Member
  • *******
  • Join Date: Feb 2016
  • Location: Seattle
  • *
  • Posts: 504
  • Country: us
  • Total likes: 334
  • Love and be free.
    • View Profile
    • Mystermercury
  • Religion: Dionysian pop culture paganism and heretical Judaism
  • Preferred Pronouns: He/him/his
Re: On the Numinosity of the Gods
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2019, 01:13:01 pm »
I've come across some discussions on some neo-pagan forums in which some describe the gods as "archetypes" and simultaneously as "not real."  Not so much around here in which a significant number of people self-identify as hard polytheists, but in some quarters I hear this kind of thinking.

From what I can ascertain of Jungian thought, and admittedly I'm still wrapping my mind around that complicated topic, this is not how Jung would have viewed the archetypes -- as "not real."  They still contain a numinous quality at least as far as the conscious mind is concerned.  Experientially they are external.  They can "happen to us."  They can interact with us in transformative and significant ways.

I acknowledge my agnosticism about many topics including the nature of the gods, miracles, the afterlife, and other topics.  I am also agnostic as to some aspects of Jungian theory, though I strongly suspect there is some truth in it at least in part.  Furthermore Jungian theories are ongoing in development and did not end with the death of Carl Jung.  They can be tweaked.

As a note here, an old therapist of mine--the best I ever had--described herself as Jungian. She was an elderly lady, so not exactly a recent graduate, but she clearly kept up-to-date on her subject and continued to take regular classes. So it certainly wasn't a dead approach to the field just a few years ago.

Quote
However, based on personal encounters I have little doubt about the numinosity of the gods or the spirits at least as far as experience is concerned.  By "numinous" I mean that there is an external and mysterious component to the gods, that we cannot fully uncover this mystery and that we can at times encounter the gods as if from without.

In terms of justifying my religious practices the bottom line is that they make me happy, and I flourish through them.  They give my life meaning.  They embody the seeking aspect of my human psychology, and there is a principle I follow in deciding on to whom and how I express devotion: "Thou shalt have no other gods before thine own well being nor worship them in any manner that is not conducive to that well being."

Worth noting here, as well, that this is a fairly basic principle in Judaism. Jewish martyrs, though not nonexistent, occupy a different place in the religion than Christian ones in theirs, and as a whole the religion strongly discourages any form of practice that harms the health of the practitioner. For instance, you're not supposed to fast on Yom Kippur if you're sick and in extra need of nutrition.

Quote
If you work with gods or other Powers do you believe they have a numinous, external quality?

It's hard not to in my case. While the possibility still exists that everything I have experienced is the result of my own brain getting really attached to some music at just the right moment, the fact remains that I have experienced extraordinary things connected to the work and memory of a real man in recent history. If this connection is real (and at this point I believe that is the more reasonable position for me to take), then of course the immortal spirit of Freddie Mercury is distinct from my personal connection with him. Most of his life occurred before I was even born, and other people have had real experiences both of the man himself and of the spirit he projected.

Quote
Do you have any thoughts that pertain to how you reconcile tensions between uncertainty and commitments to certain belief structures or assumptions?

I have discussed this before to some extent in other posts--I have mostly been learning to discard certain assumptions about the nature of reality and embrace a world of polyvalent truth where different, sometimes even conflicting models apply to the world around me depending on the situation.
"The peacock can show its whole tail at once, but I can only tell you a story."
--JAMES ALAN GARDNER

EclecticWheel

  • Staff
  • *
  • Join Date: Jul 2013
  • Location: Texas
  • Posts: 671
  • Country: us
  • Total likes: 160
    • View Profile
  • Religion: Re-evaluating/ Star & Marian Rites, Agnostic with faith
  • Preferred Pronouns: he/him/his
Re: On the Numinosity of the Gods
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2019, 05:52:42 pm »
I have discussed this before to some extent in other posts--I have mostly been learning to discard certain assumptions about the nature of reality and embrace a world of polyvalent truth where different, sometimes even conflicting models apply to the world around me depending on the situation.

I feel similarly if not the same altogether and have also posted on this topic.  Different models are better suited to different contexts, and all truth as we know it is an approximation.
My personal moral code:

Love wisely, and do what thou wilt.

Zlote Jablko

  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Join Date: Oct 2018
  • Location: Texas
  • Posts: 167
  • Country: us
  • Total likes: 87
    • View Profile
  • Religion: Slavic/ PIE Recon
Re: On the Numinosity of the Gods
« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2019, 12:07:34 am »
I've come across some discussions on some neo-pagan forums in which some describe the gods as "archetypes" and simultaneously as "not real."  Not so much around here in which a significant number of people self-identify as hard polytheists, but in some quarters I hear this kind of thinking.

From what I can ascertain of Jungian thought, and admittedly I'm still wrapping my mind around that complicated topic, this is not how Jung would have viewed the archetypes -- as "not real."  They still contain a numinous quality at least as far as the conscious mind is concerned.  Experientially they are external.  They can "happen to us."  They can interact with us in transformative and significant ways.

I acknowledge my agnosticism about many topics including the nature of the gods, miracles, the afterlife, and other topics.  I am also agnostic as to some aspects of Jungian theory, though I strongly suspect there is some truth in it at least in part.  Furthermore Jungian theories are ongoing in development and did not end with the death of Carl Jung.  They can be tweaked.

I suspect there is a strong psychological element. While I do believe in Gods, one of my motives is that I think they tend to unlock a symbolic part of the human brain that can be very difficult or impossible to master through rational means. For me, it feels natural. It seems like this is the way mind is supposed to work. I do consider myself kind of an agnostic believer. My belief is not based on an pretense of certain knowledge, which can be a dangerous thing. It's genuine belief tempered with uncertainty, and combined with psychological and cultural appreciation that would exist even in the absence of theistic belief.



I can only speculate as to how much we can learn about the gods is humanly constructed and how much is of a numinous quality.  I suspect that there are both components present within them and that both pantheons and even Yahweh are at least in part humanity "writ large," thus my arrival at the interpretation that "Thou shalt have no other gods before me," boils down to "Thou shalt have no other gods before thine own well being."

Yahweh is always difficult to explain from a pagan perspective. I accept a lot of the scholarship suggesting that El and Yahweh may have originally been distinct. I think that explains some of the confusion. In my view El was not at all jealous, and in fact was a pretty aloof power who was happy to entrust the human world to younger deities. Possibly not different from my own creator God. Yahweh appears to have been very different. I have my own theories about him, which might potentially be offensive. Of course I'm not the first dualist to say that the Bible may be of a mixed pedigree. The Gnostics did as well.

For me, sexism is more of a conflict. I encounter a lot of sexism in my chosen lore. I think that's humanity writ large in many ways. In my case, I try to restore the divine feminine in my practice to try and correct for it.

If you work with gods or other Powers do you believe they have a numinous, external quality?

Do you have any thoughts that pertain to how you reconcile tensions between uncertainty and commitments to certain belief structures or assumptions?

Thanks again for reading!

I think they are numinous, but there is a connection to the human psyche. I have a personal theory that the spirits of ancestors can sort of imprint on them, so they can incorporate certain human qualities of their followers as well as being the lodestone that drew those followers in the first place. In that sense, the archetype is more like the bridge that allows us to mentally bond with a certain deity. The human and God both understand the archetype. It's something that transcends the divide between Gods and their followers, and that's grounds for a mutual understanding. Just a theory.

I also think that deities may have reducible components or fragments. So for example, in Lithuanian folklore, you have a fate Goddess called "Laima." Yet you also have lots of fairies called Laumes who are not always very different from Laima, with the exception that they seem smaller and more down to Earth. Sometimes three Laumes go from house to house distributing individual destinies, not unlike the Slavic Rodzanitsas. So in many cases, a deity may have a substance to them that can be divvied up and combined in a number of different ways, yet this doesn't "kill" the more complete deity or invalidate them.

Like you say though, there is always uncertainty. I honestly think that's healthy. My tradition helps complete me without stripping away all skepticism. If you can swing that, I think it's really the best of both worlds.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2019, 12:11:22 am by Zlote Jablko »

Eastling

  • Sr. Master Member
  • *******
  • Join Date: Feb 2016
  • Location: Seattle
  • *
  • Posts: 504
  • Country: us
  • Total likes: 334
  • Love and be free.
    • View Profile
    • Mystermercury
  • Religion: Dionysian pop culture paganism and heretical Judaism
  • Preferred Pronouns: He/him/his
Re: On the Numinosity of the Gods
« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2019, 03:02:40 pm »
Yahweh is always difficult to explain from a pagan perspective. I accept a lot of the scholarship suggesting that El and Yahweh may have originally been distinct. I think that explains some of the confusion. In my view El was not at all jealous, and in fact was a pretty aloof power who was happy to entrust the human world to younger deities. Possibly not different from my own creator God. Yahweh appears to have been very different. I have my own theories about him, which might potentially be offensive. Of course I'm not the first dualist to say that the Bible may be of a mixed pedigree. The Gnostics did as well.

The Bible being "of a mixed pedigree" is also well-accepted by academic scholars.

As far as Yahweh goes I am fascinated by Nissim Amzallag's theory (which I have mentioned before) that he was originally the Canaanite god of metallurgy, associated with the creation of new materials via smelting. Amzallag puts forth the idea that various aspects of the ritualistic nature of early metallurgy produced a very singular god associated with fractious relationships with other gods.

This is the academic explanation, but on a spiritual level I find it very plausible that the possibly-unique invention of furnace metallurgy in the southern Levant (which Amzallag argues for fairly persuasively) would have resulted in human beings "discovering" an extant Power associated with physical transformation and creation who also happened to be jealously isolationist.

Although I was raised Jewish and to a certain extent am still practicing, I believe giving this god the isolation he desires without question is not actually the most productive way of working with him. Considering the persistent appearance of other Powers (such as the Shekhina and various angels and demons) in Jewish mysticism, albeit with qualifications of "really they're just part of the whole that is God" or "they're just his servants, not actually gods themselves," I suspect I am not the only one to come around to this idea.

TL;DR the origins of Abrahamic monotheism are quite complex and prone to mutation in the millennia that followed.
"The peacock can show its whole tail at once, but I can only tell you a story."
--JAMES ALAN GARDNER

EclecticWheel

  • Staff
  • *
  • Join Date: Jul 2013
  • Location: Texas
  • Posts: 671
  • Country: us
  • Total likes: 160
    • View Profile
  • Religion: Re-evaluating/ Star & Marian Rites, Agnostic with faith
  • Preferred Pronouns: he/him/his
Re: On the Numinosity of the Gods
« Reply #6 on: April 10, 2019, 03:28:15 pm »
Although I was raised Jewish and to a certain extent am still practicing, I believe giving this god the isolation he desires without question is not actually the most productive way of working with him. Considering the persistent appearance of other Powers (such as the Shekhina and various angels and demons) in Jewish mysticism, albeit with qualifications of "really they're just part of the whole that is God" or "they're just his servants, not actually gods themselves," I suspect I am not the only one to come around to this idea.

TL;DR the origins of Abrahamic monotheism are quite complex and prone to mutation in the millennia that followed.

I tend to focus on the portions of the Hebrew Bible that are more fuzzy on monotheism.  The Bible is very mixed in so many ways.  I know some try to reconcile every part of it, but I don't.

What interests me about Yahweh is his evolution even beyond the Hebrew Bible.  The trinitarian Yahweh is a multiplicity of persons who have no problem with being worshiped together as they are mysteriously one deity.  In religions like Catholicism and Orthodoxy he allows mere humans to participate in the divine nature in some way.  The saints are even able to be venerated.

Though there are official distinctions between veneration and worship, much of the Psalter of the Blessed Virgin Mary by St. Bonaventure sounds like outright worship to me.  I link that below.  Check out psalm 23 for instance.

The Father even shares his glory with a human being who is his Son in the trinitarian version.  So this Yahweh looks quite a lot different.  And it makes me wonder if there are somehow multiple Yahweh's that may be worshiped in different contexts some of which are more fuzzy on the monotheism.

I also speculate about Jesus similarly since he has been viewed in different contexts including the view that he is a mere prophet, Sabellianism, Arianism, Trinitarianism, and other contexts as well.

Forgive my possibly less than clear ramblings.  I just woke up, and this topic is complicated for me.

https://www.ewtn.com/library/SOURCES/PSALTER.TXT
My personal moral code:

Love wisely, and do what thou wilt.

Riothamus12

  • Master Member
  • ******
  • Join Date: Jul 2013
  • Posts: 354
  • Country: 00
  • Total likes: 13
    • View Profile
  • Religion: The Nameless Path
  • Preferred Pronouns: He/Him/His
Re: On the Numinosity of the Gods
« Reply #7 on: April 17, 2019, 12:15:22 am »
I tend to focus on the portions of the Hebrew Bible that are more fuzzy on monotheism.  The Bible is very mixed in so many ways.  I know some try to reconcile every part of it, but I don't.

What interests me about Yahweh is his evolution even beyond the Hebrew Bible.  The trinitarian Yahweh is a multiplicity of persons who have no problem with being worshiped together as they are mysteriously one deity.  In religions like Catholicism and Orthodoxy he allows mere humans to participate in the divine nature in some way.  The saints are even able to be venerated.

Though there are official distinctions between veneration and worship, much of the Psalter of the Blessed Virgin Mary by St. Bonaventure sounds like outright worship to me.  I link that below.  Check out psalm 23 for instance.

The Father even shares his glory with a human being who is his Son in the trinitarian version.  So this Yahweh looks quite a lot different.  And it makes me wonder if there are somehow multiple Yahweh's that may be worshiped in different contexts some of which are more fuzzy on the monotheism.

I also speculate about Jesus similarly since he has been viewed in different contexts including the view that he is a mere prophet, Sabellianism, Arianism, Trinitarianism, and other contexts as well.

Forgive my possibly less than clear ramblings.  I just woke up, and this topic is complicated for me.

https://www.ewtn.com/library/SOURCES/PSALTER.TXT

I do. One thing I have never liked about many chaos magicians is that the way they speak of the universe is too humanocentric. Granted, we are all very painfully human and thus some amount of this cannot be avoided. However, the world does not hinge around us and there are other beings that exist outside us that we see with regularity. I mean if we're going with the it's all in your head approach, how do I know I'm not a thought form run amok created by a wolf or some species that we've not directly seen? What if we're all thoughtforms conjured up by a higher power?

The idea of the Deities being purely beings of psychological internal origin does not make sense to me, but I say this because many people who posit these notions don't stop to ponder their own biases.I try to aim for a more cosmocentric perspective, though admittedly, I am still limited and influenced by the very fact that I am but a human. Of course, I also have a somewhat different idea of what a Deity is. I often describe them as being a sapient cosmic forces or akin to a living law of physics, but even these may be inadequate to describe them.

I have however pondered how many exist as literal distinct beings. Are they all aspects of one, aspects of a comparatively small handful of different Deities, literally distinct Divine beings, or some weird combo of one or more? That is the question I ask myself most often, though I also ponder if such a matter is really important. They exist, they guide me and countless others, and they are worthy of my reverence. That is more important to me.

All this being said, I am a spirit medium who has felt the presence of various Spirits, spoken with them, encountered the power and emissaries of various Deities (even experienced possessions personally and saw one happen to another person who got taken by the power of Goddess and returned to consciousness remembering none of it), so having experienced them so to speak in addition to a number of other factors, I am certain that they exist externally.
« Last Edit: April 17, 2019, 06:29:07 pm by SunflowerP »
https://inthespiritofconversation.wordpress.com/
I started a blog. Feel free to peruse. It's still in it's early stages and I have to write more, so do bare with me if it's all a little basic so far.

SunflowerP

  • Host
  • *
  • Join Date: Jun 2011
  • Location: Calgary AB
  • Posts: 8311
  • Country: ca
  • Total likes: 266
  • Don't teach your grandmother to suck eggs!
    • View Profile
    • If You Ain't Makin' Waves, You Ain't Kickin' Hard Enough
  • Religion: Eclectic religious Witchcraft
  • Preferred Pronouns: sie/hir/hirs/hirself
Re: On the Numinosity of the Gods
« Reply #8 on: April 17, 2019, 06:31:18 pm »

A Reminder:
Hi, Riothamus12,

We don't mind long posts here, but to avoid having a hard-to-read wall-o'-text, hitting "enter" twice every few lines adds some white space and makes it easier to follow - I've edited yours to add those breaks, but it's a really good habit to get into yourself.

They don't have to be the "proper" place for paragraph breaks (we're interested in readability more than technicalities), or a complete change of thought - some thoughts take a lot of lines and need to be broken up into sub-thoughts - as long as they're there.

This isn't a formal warning, just a reminder. No reply is necessary, but if you have questions or need clarification,  please feel free to contact a member of staff privately.

Thanks!
Sunflower
TC Forum Staff
I'm the AntiFa genderqueer commie eclectic wiccan Mod your alt-right bros warned you about.
I do so have a life; I just live part of it online!
“Selfishness is not living as one wishes to live, it is asking others to live as one wishes to live.” - Oscar Wilde
"Nobody's good at anything until they practice." - Brina (Yewberry)
My much-neglected blog "If You Ain't Makin' Waves, You Ain't Kickin' Hard Enough"

Tags:
 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
9 Replies
6969 Views
Last post April 07, 2017, 05:57:02 am
by Shewhoseeks
12 Replies
3270 Views
Last post July 20, 2011, 12:58:36 pm
by TisiphoneSeraph
15 Replies
3403 Views
Last post March 28, 2012, 07:24:13 am
by Aine Rayne
42 Replies
3781 Views
Last post March 22, 2016, 07:37:08 pm
by Sobekemiti
4 Replies
2277 Views
Last post November 24, 2016, 05:14:25 am
by SerpentineSorcerer

* Who's Online

  • Dot Guests: 52
  • Dot Hidden: 0
  • Dot Users: 1
  • Dot Users Online:

* Please Donate!

The Cauldron's server is expensive and requires monthly payments. Please become a Bronze, Silver or Gold Donor if you can. Donations are needed every month. Without member support, we can't afford the server.

* In Memoriam

Chavi (2006)
Elspeth (2010)
Marilyn (2013)

* Cauldron Staff

Host:
Sunflower

Message Board Staff
Board Coordinator:
Darkhawk

Assistant Board Coordinator:
Aster Breo

Senior Staff:
Aisling, Jenett, Sefiru

Staff:
Allaya, Chatelaine, EclecticWheel, HarpingHawke, Kylara, PerditaPickle, rocquelaire

Discord Chat Staff
Chat Coordinator:
Morag

Cauldron Council:
Bob, Catja, Emma-Eldritch, Fausta, Jubes, Kelly, LyricFox, Phouka, Sperran, Star, Steve, Tana

Site Administrator:
Randall