collapse
2019 Donation Drive

It's time for our annual Server Donation Drive! We need to raise at least $650 (same as last year) to keep The Cauldron's server online for another year. Please help! Either hit that Paypal button to the right and make a one-time donation in any amount or set up a monthly Bronze, Silver or Gold Donor subscription. You can find more info in this message!

Donations as of 16 Sept 2019: $660 donated. $10 more our minimum goal! Let's beat last year's total of $99 more than the minimum!


Note: This total is updated manually, usually once a day


* "Unable to verify referring url. Please go back and try again" Problem Logging In?

If you get an "Unable to verify referring url. Please go back and try again" error when you try to log in, you need to be sure you are accessing the board with a url that starts with "https://ecauldron.com".  If it starts with https://www.ecauldron.com" (or "http://www.ecauldron.com") you will get this error because "www.ecauldron.com" is not technically the same website as "ecauldron.com". Moving to the more secure "https" means it is more picky about such things.

Author Topic: Hard Polytheism, Soft Polytheism, and Everything In Between  (Read 18516 times)

Juniperberry

  • Grand Master Member
  • *******
  • Join Date: Jul 2011
  • Banned!
  • Posts: 1891
  • Total likes: 3
    • View Profile
Re: Hard Polytheism, Soft Polytheism, and Everything In Between
« Reply #165 on: February 16, 2015, 12:44:18 am »
Quote from: carillion;171034
From the study :

""In summary, the purpose of this research was to explore the feasibility of  interviewing children about IC's as a way to learn more about early fantasy and to determine the best way to encourage children to interact with their IC's in the lab."

"Thus, children who differ in whether or not they create imaginary friends do not differ in their ability to distinguish pretend or real objects or to distinguish fantasy from reality"
 


To be frank, I don't think it's asking too much that if one is going to extrapolate from a rather old study with an n of 12 that there should be an expectation that the research will be presented accurately.

It's better to just state something is your honest opinion than to misrepresent the findings of a study.

That information came from the second source I cited  and not the Harvard study.

I'll wait while you go over that. (Though it'd be nice if you could find time to address the bigger picture as well.)
« Last Edit: February 16, 2015, 12:45:15 am by Juniperberry »
The pace of progress in artificial intelligence (I’m not referring to narrow AI) is incredibly fast. [...] The risk of something seriously dangerous happening is in the five year timeframe. 10 years at most.--Elon Musk

I am in the camp that is concerned about super intelligence," [Bill] Gates wrote. "First the machines will do a lot of jobs for us and not be super intelligent. That should be positive if we manage it well. A few decades after that though the intelligence is strong enough to be a concern. I agree with Elon Musk and some others on this and don\'t understand why some people are not concerned."

carillion

  • Sr. Master Member
  • *******
  • Join Date: Jul 2014
  • Posts: 664
  • Total likes: 1
    • View Profile
Re: Hard Polytheism, Soft Polytheism, and Everything In Between
« Reply #166 on: February 16, 2015, 01:13:22 am »
Quote from: Juniperberry;171036
That information came from the second source I cited  and not the Harvard study.

I'll wait while you go over that. (Though it'd be nice if you could find time to address the bigger picture as well.)


You wrote " the purpose of the study". The other source you mentioned was a book, so I assumed you meant the study you cited.

And seriously, you will "wait while I go over that". I'm a fast reader but just whipping over an entire book full of conference proceedings and other articles which arose from it ( let alone paying over a 100 bucks for it and waiting while Amazon delivers) is a bit like stating " And I don't expect to hear back for awhile".

I'm sorry, I thought you were being serious.

Juniperberry

  • Grand Master Member
  • *******
  • Join Date: Jul 2011
  • Banned!
  • Posts: 1891
  • Total likes: 3
    • View Profile
Re: Hard Polytheism, Soft Polytheism, and Everything In Between
« Reply #167 on: February 16, 2015, 02:08:16 am »
Quote from: carillion;171038


And seriously, you will "wait while I go over that". I'm a fast reader but just whipping over an entire book full of conference proceedings and other articles which arose from it ( let alone paying over a 100 bucks for it and waiting while Amazon delivers) is a bit like stating " And I don't expect to hear back for awhile".

I'm sorry, I thought you were being serious.



I think you're missing the point. It doesn't *matter* if you go over the damn book. That's the funny part! (Well, to me, anyway.)

Here, for argument's sake and to save you the trouble, I'll just say that you're right and that nowhere in the history of studies will it say that kids with IFs differ in determining fantasy from reality from those who don't.  Point to you.

But that's such a small, insignificant portion of the bigger discussion. How does it change  the fact that some children have a natural need to create  IFs, which are  fundamentally helpful to their development?

IOW, since you think religion can be summed up as a belief in IFs, then this would suggest that for some people, religion is a natural, fundamental need and it has a positive impact on their mental and social skills.

Yes, a case could be made that that need could be met in other ways, but would you really suggest that people deny their creative, natural tendencies of filtering and exploring the world, because religion ew, and find more "acceptable" ways to exercise their social and mental skills?


(For the record, I do not think religion amounts to IFs, but I'm trying to meet you where you stand. )
The pace of progress in artificial intelligence (I’m not referring to narrow AI) is incredibly fast. [...] The risk of something seriously dangerous happening is in the five year timeframe. 10 years at most.--Elon Musk

I am in the camp that is concerned about super intelligence," [Bill] Gates wrote. "First the machines will do a lot of jobs for us and not be super intelligent. That should be positive if we manage it well. A few decades after that though the intelligence is strong enough to be a concern. I agree with Elon Musk and some others on this and don\'t understand why some people are not concerned."

Faemon

  • Grand Master Member
  • *******
  • Join Date: May 2012
  • Posts: 1229
  • Total likes: 9
    • View Profile
Re: Hard Polytheism, Soft Polytheism, and Everything In Between
« Reply #168 on: February 16, 2015, 04:48:47 am »
Quote from: carillion;170888
Everybody has their own individual needs and wants , there is no one , two or multiple specific lists. So when someone says " I *need* such and such , it's only specific to *themselves*, it says nothing about other peoples wants and needs OR...the thing that they need.
 
That's probably one of the reasons why religions or any large systems of belief (like politics) fracture and schism - because no one system fits everyone. Because *I* believe I 'need' something, doesn't mean the thing one is discussing can be classed as a 'need' for anyone else.

If someone tells you that they are a very high stress person and the only thing that relieves their tension is skiing, that they really do need to get out and ski or their stress becomes unbearable, it doesn't follow that skiing can be classed as a *need*.

As for 'basic truths', in the realms of philosophy, I've not met one yet. So no, I'm not religious.:)

Quote from: Darkhawk;170893
Whyever not?

The person in question wants to not be suffering from unbearable tension; in order for that to be the case, they need to go skiing.

The only reason it wouldn't be something they need to achieve their desired end is if you're asserting that they're lying.

A need is a necessary step towards a desired end.  It doesn't exist in an abstract space

...

There is no cosmic principle under which a specific individual life is necessary in the abstract outside of fantasy novels; any need to survive is necessarily personal and subjective, one, and pursuant to something that an entity wants.

I think those two comments can take this back to the main point.

Atheism isn't neutral for being a lack of something.

Sexuality parallels ahoy.

Celibacy is a lack of something, too. Still, a lot of sexual people can look back at a childhood environment where sexuality is taboo and go, "That was so repressive that it did damage by removing/ignoring that part of life," whereas asexual people might feel oppressed by inescapable expressions of sexuality and sexual expectations in public spaces (even as a latent expression.)

Who needs a sex life?

It depends on the individual. It depends on the individual to look back and say that they weren't given enough information or given Too Much Information. It's individual.

Imagine one individual saying to another individual: "No, you were so lucky to be 'repressed' because I was so pressured in the environment that I grew up in. You have nothing to complain about because lack of exposure to this does absolutely no harm." Isn't that selfishly universalizing their own experience and bias?

If a notion of a privative is not itself a privative, how can there be any claim to a neutral/objective position?
« Last Edit: February 16, 2015, 04:49:37 am by Faemon »
The Codex of Poesy: wishcraft, faelatry, alchemy, and other slight misspellings.
the Otherfaith: Chromatic Genderbending Faery Monarchs of Technology. DeviantArt

Jabberwocky

  • Master Member
  • ******
  • Join Date: Feb 2012
  • Posts: 449
  • Total likes: 20
    • View Profile
Re: Hard Polytheism, Soft Polytheism, and Everything In Between
« Reply #169 on: February 16, 2015, 09:32:16 am »
Quote from: carillion;170734
But atheism is the *absence* of religion, so there's nothing to 'recover' from. I can't really imagine someone suffering from , um, nothing being said or done about religion when they were growing up.

 
While atheism might theoretically mean nothing more then the absence of religion, it's frequently the case that atheism is part of a wider philosophical belief system, whether that's anti-theism, reductive materialism or Marxism.  Or, as Eagleton puts it:

Quote
These are not just the views of an enraged atheist. They are the opinions of a readily identifiable kind of English middle-class liberal rationalist. Reading Dawkins, who occasionally writes as though ‘Thou still unravish’d bride of quietness’ is a mighty funny way to describe a Grecian urn, one can be reasonably certain that he would not be Europe’s greatest enthusiast for Foucault, psychoanalysis, agitprop, Dadaism, anarchism or separatist feminism. All of these phenomena, one imagines, would be as distasteful to his brisk, bloodless rationality as the virgin birth. Yet one can of course be an atheist and a fervent fan of them all. His God-hating, then, is by no means simply the view of a scientist admirably cleansed of prejudice. It belongs to a specific cultural context. One would not expect to muster many votes for either anarchism or the virgin birth in North Oxford. (I should point out that I use the term North Oxford in an ideological rather than geographical sense. Dawkins may be relieved to know that I don’t actually know where he lives.)


(That review is worth reading in full, especially if you like academic slapfights).

And I do think, taking context into account, that it was obvious that we were going to be talking about more then a simple disbelief in deities.
Your heart is a muscle as big as your fist.

Jabberwocky

  • Master Member
  • ******
  • Join Date: Feb 2012
  • Posts: 449
  • Total likes: 20
    • View Profile
Re: Hard Polytheism, Soft Polytheism, and Everything In Between
« Reply #170 on: February 16, 2015, 09:45:37 am »
Quote from: Darkhawk;170795
It's not clear to me whether that study is dealing with areligious or nondoctrinaire households from the article.  There is, after all, nothing in what the article describes as superior that's incompatible with most of the upbringings that have included religion that I have observed.

 
On top of which "secular" and "non religious" aren't antonyms.  

I was brought up in a secular household by a Quaker mother.
Your heart is a muscle as big as your fist.

Darkhawk

  • Senior Staff
  • *
  • Join Date: Jun 2011
  • Posts: 4824
  • Country: us
  • Total likes: 709
    • View Profile
    • Suns in her Branches
  • Religion: An American Werewolf in the Akhet; Kemetic; Feri; Imaginary Baltic Heathen; Discordian; CoX; Etc.
  • Preferred Pronouns: any of he, she, they
Re: Hard Polytheism, Soft Polytheism, and Everything In Between
« Reply #171 on: February 16, 2015, 11:13:09 am »
Quote from: Jabberwocky;171050
I was brought up in a secular household by a Quaker mother.

 
I have no idea how to describe the household I was brought up in, but "nominally Christian, but sufficiently secular that it literally didn't occur to me that religion was a thing for the family of one of my friends who had crucifixes all over her house until I learned years later that her parents had disowned her brother for being gay" would be part of it.  I have a lot of Christmas traditions that are very important to me, none of which are explicitly religious.  (My father, nominally Anglican, has described himself as a devout Dickensian, believing in ostentatiously overdecorated trees, smoking bishop punch, and "God bless us, every one".)

I was introduced to organised religion very literally in terms of comparison shopping.  (Apparently the neighbours were concerned about my lack of organised religion, which I learned years later; what I knew was that I had offers of people to take me to two of the three churches in town and was asked if I wanted to go, and wound up evaluating both, mostly settling on the Methodists (for whom I still have a deep fondness) because the Catholic church was alarming to me.)  I spent a lot of time in church pining for the sort of connectivity and community that I perceived other people as having and not finding it except in the music, doing the word-finds they gave to kids at the beginning of the service, and actually listening to the sermons.
as the water grinds the stone
we rise and fall
as our ashes turn to dust
we shine like stars    - Covenant, "Bullet"

Faemon

  • Grand Master Member
  • *******
  • Join Date: May 2012
  • Posts: 1229
  • Total likes: 9
    • View Profile
Re: Hard Polytheism, Soft Polytheism, and Everything In Between
« Reply #172 on: February 16, 2015, 07:22:13 pm »
Quote from: Jabberwocky;171047
While atheism might theoretically mean nothing more then the absence of religion, it's frequently the case that atheism is part of a wider philosophical belief system, whether that's anti-theism, reductive materialism or Marxism.

And I do think, taking context into account, that it was obvious that we were going to be talking about more then a simple disbelief in deities.

 
Not only as a non-privative privative (I'm actually getting tired of typing that word), then, but as a compounded/contextual notion that's part of a wider philosophy...is a good point, I think.

It could possibly also apply to hard polytheism and soft polytheism. I think I mentioned somewhere else that hard polytheism (as a philosophy) seems to me to have come in large part from the pushback against the cultural appropriation element of eclecticism; which in turn seems to have come from the pushback against monotheistic supremacy whereby everything else is wrong and lumped together or that any two mythologies or perspectives that are different (like, extremely different) can't both be true hence "nope this is real and true because it's basically the same thing in the human condition informing individual fulfillment context". Then it went all, "Yay individualism, yay fulfillment, but just please do some more research instead of only picking the shiny bits."
The Codex of Poesy: wishcraft, faelatry, alchemy, and other slight misspellings.
the Otherfaith: Chromatic Genderbending Faery Monarchs of Technology. DeviantArt

Ghost235

  • Sr. Apprentice
  • ****
  • Join Date: Oct 2014
  • Posts: 98
  • Total likes: 0
    • View Profile
Re: Hard Polytheism, Soft Polytheism, and Everything In Between
« Reply #173 on: February 17, 2015, 01:57:53 pm »
Quote from: Jabberwocky;171047
While atheism might theoretically mean nothing more then the absence of religion, it's frequently the case that atheism is part of a wider philosophical belief system, whether that's anti-theism, reductive materialism or Marxism.  Or, as Eagleton puts it:



(That review is worth reading in full, especially if you like academic slapfights).

And I do think, taking context into account, that it was obvious that we were going to be talking about more then a simple disbelief in deities.

 
This is most definitely true.

What most but not all people don't seem to realize is that you can not believe in some sort of "deity what created it all" while still believing in gods, goddesses, nature spirits, and so forth.  

In some of the non-Western schools of Buddhism such a view is quite common(I've been to at least two teachings personally that started with an offering to the local land spirits much like you would see in Pagan rites.).  

The particular brand of atheism most people in religious communities come into contact is "New Atheism", also known as "militant atheism".  I myself call them "evangelical atheists" as they tend to be very interested in converting people to their belief system.  This evangelical nature, by the way, is why religious types tend to see only this type of atheist.  Most other atheists tend to stay far away from religious forums.  I myself have seen people very much like this in Buddhist forums, though in that area they talk more about consciousness as an epiphenomenon of the brain than the existance of deities.  Different words, same tune.

Going way back to the original topic.  Hard and soft polytheism.

This is 100% my opinion and is not any form of "revealed Truth" or anything like that.

First I have to take a big step back and talk about the nature of deities.  I think that deities, like matter, energy, etc., were once one big ball of undifferentiated stuff.  It is possible that there were deities before our universe was as it is now.  Regardless, a very, very long time ago there was a gigantic ball of stuff that had everything, deity stuff included.  

At some point this big ball of undifferentiated stuff exploded into various categories of stuff.  As time passed these categories split into other categories and eventually we had the world.  Most scientists think that the categories stopped splitting at some point relatively soon after things "began", I can't recall if it was a few seconds or a year or two.  Time at that point was kinda meaningless.

Such was not the case.  I think that there was this gigantic ball of "deity stuff" that was undifferentiated and perhaps not even anthropomorphic.  I do, however, think that this "stuff" reacts to consciousness.  When consciousness touches this "stuff" it shapes it and thus a new deity is "born"*.  Once a new deity is born it is originally somewhat connected to the overall pool of "deity stuff".  However, as it ages and consciousnesses interact with it more the deity becomes more distinct.  

Over time if consciousnesses stop interacting with this deity it starts to melt back into "deity stuff", but it never really fully melts back.  Some of that "stuff" stays, like a worn valley where a river used to go.  

One thing to note.  I think that interacting with a deity is not just the follower influcing the deity as much as co-creative.  The deity influences the follower just as much as vice versa(we collectively dictate the form of the deity, the deity influences us on a far more personal level).  

So, there that is.  Long story short, I think that the young universe had soft polytheism but morphs into hard polytheism over time.

*I am not sure if pre-human creatures touched this "stuff" but the idea of dinosaur gods is kinda interesting and scary to think about.

Yei

  • Sr. Master Member
  • *******
  • Join Date: May 2012
  • Posts: 546
  • Country: au
  • Total likes: 133
    • View Profile
  • Religion: Mexica Reconstructionism
  • Preferred Pronouns: He/Him/His
Re: Hard Polytheism, Soft Polytheism, and Everything In Between
« Reply #174 on: February 17, 2015, 04:15:16 pm »
Quote from: Faemon;171063
Not only as a non-privative privative (I'm actually getting tired of typing that word), then, but as a compounded/contextual notion that's part of a wider philosophy...is a good point, I think.

It could possibly also apply to hard polytheism and soft polytheism. I think I mentioned somewhere else that hard polytheism (as a philosophy) seems to me to have come in large part from the pushback against the cultural appropriation element of eclecticism; which in turn seems to have come from the pushback against monotheistic supremacy whereby everything else is wrong and lumped together or that any two mythologies or perspectives that are different (like, extremely different) can't both be true hence "nope this is real and true because it's basically the same thing in the human condition informing individual fulfillment context". Then it went all, "Yay individualism, yay fulfillment, but just please do some more research instead of only picking the shiny bits."

 
I myself have often wondered if one of the key differences between harder, reconstructionist polytheists and softer, more eclectic polytheists was their relationship to authority. Is eclectic polytheism more hostile to structure, scripture and the idea of priesthood while reconstructionism has a more positive view on those things.

Jabberwocky

  • Master Member
  • ******
  • Join Date: Feb 2012
  • Posts: 449
  • Total likes: 20
    • View Profile
Re: Hard Polytheism, Soft Polytheism, and Everything In Between
« Reply #175 on: February 17, 2015, 06:31:09 pm »
Quote from: Yei;171075
I myself have often wondered if one of the key differences between harder, reconstructionist polytheists and softer, more eclectic polytheists was their relationship to authority. Is eclectic polytheism more hostile to structure, scripture and the idea of priesthood while reconstructionism has a more positive view on those things.

 
I'd cautiously agree that's a trend, but I don't think it's a key difference.  That suggests that it's a hard and fast rule rather than a general guideline.  I think we're talking correlation here, not causation.

Both groupings can certainly have issues with bad leadership, although I suspect they mostly express themselves in different ways.  Explicit authoritarianism vs the tyranny of structurelessness.
Your heart is a muscle as big as your fist.

Yei

  • Sr. Master Member
  • *******
  • Join Date: May 2012
  • Posts: 546
  • Country: au
  • Total likes: 133
    • View Profile
  • Religion: Mexica Reconstructionism
  • Preferred Pronouns: He/Him/His
Re: Hard Polytheism, Soft Polytheism, and Everything In Between
« Reply #176 on: February 17, 2015, 08:03:07 pm »
Quote from: Jabberwocky;171078
I'd cautiously agree that's a trend, but I don't think it's a key difference.  That suggests that it's a hard and fast rule rather than a general guideline.  I think we're talking correlation here, not causation.

Both groupings can certainly have issues with bad leadership, although I suspect they mostly express themselves in different ways.  Explicit authoritarianism vs the tyranny of structurelessness.

 
Yes of course. I should specify that I don't believe that this would be the only difference, just one. And in any case I only suspect I have no real evidence. It would be interesting to find out.

Darkhawk

  • Senior Staff
  • *
  • Join Date: Jun 2011
  • Posts: 4824
  • Country: us
  • Total likes: 709
    • View Profile
    • Suns in her Branches
  • Religion: An American Werewolf in the Akhet; Kemetic; Feri; Imaginary Baltic Heathen; Discordian; CoX; Etc.
  • Preferred Pronouns: any of he, she, they
Re: Hard Polytheism, Soft Polytheism, and Everything In Between
« Reply #177 on: February 17, 2015, 09:09:07 pm »
Quote from: Faemon;171063
It could possibly also apply to hard polytheism and soft polytheism. I think I mentioned somewhere else that hard polytheism (as a philosophy) seems to me to have come in large part from the pushback against the cultural appropriation element of eclecticism; which in turn seems to have come from the pushback against monotheistic supremacy ...

 
Hard polytheism and the reconstructions and a few other things are reactive against hypersyncretic formulations, but that's more Romantic-period stuff than anything having to do with eclecticism.  (And, incidentally, you seem to be stating that "ecleticism" necessarily contains "cultural appropriation", which is factually incorrect at best, in at least two ways.)

The White Goddess and stuff like that.  Dion Fortune's "All gods are one god, and all goddesses are one goddess, and there is one initiator."  That kind of thing.
as the water grinds the stone
we rise and fall
as our ashes turn to dust
we shine like stars    - Covenant, "Bullet"

Faemon

  • Grand Master Member
  • *******
  • Join Date: May 2012
  • Posts: 1229
  • Total likes: 9
    • View Profile
Re: Hard Polytheism, Soft Polytheism, and Everything In Between
« Reply #178 on: February 18, 2015, 12:21:50 am »
Quote from: Darkhawk;171081
Hard polytheism and the reconstructions and a few other things are reactive against hypersyncretic formulations, but that's more Romantic-period stuff than anything having to do with eclecticism.  (And, incidentally, you seem to be stating that "ecleticism" necessarily contains "cultural appropriation", which is factually incorrect at best, in at least two ways.)


Cultural appropriation of Romanticism, then?

Eclecticism does not necessarily lead to cultural appropriation. I have no studies to cite any correlation or overlap between pagans who identify as eclectics and engage in appropriative activities as part of that practice.

Quote
The White Goddess and stuff like that.  Dion Fortune's "All gods are one god, and all goddesses are one goddess, and there is one initiator."  That kind of thing.


To clarify these kinds of things are: Romanticism? Hypersyncretism? Or eclecticism? (I have never heard of or read of The White Goddess until you mentioned it.)
The Codex of Poesy: wishcraft, faelatry, alchemy, and other slight misspellings.
the Otherfaith: Chromatic Genderbending Faery Monarchs of Technology. DeviantArt

Darkhawk

  • Senior Staff
  • *
  • Join Date: Jun 2011
  • Posts: 4824
  • Country: us
  • Total likes: 709
    • View Profile
    • Suns in her Branches
  • Religion: An American Werewolf in the Akhet; Kemetic; Feri; Imaginary Baltic Heathen; Discordian; CoX; Etc.
  • Preferred Pronouns: any of he, she, they
Re: Hard Polytheism, Soft Polytheism, and Everything In Between
« Reply #179 on: February 18, 2015, 10:58:14 am »
Quote from: Faemon;171090
Cultural appropriation of Romanticism, then?


No.  Romanticism.  Which was an artistic/cultural movement of emotional evocation, nostalgia for past times, the imagination of the natural world as more authentic than the industrial, and creation of national mythologies.  It brought with it a revival of interest in classical mythology, and is one of the deep roots of the modern pagan movement.

Among other things, it set the stage for the revivalist period of veneration of Pan in the late 1800s which of course set up the notion of 'the horned god' as a widespread model of nature-oriented divinity.

Quote
To clarify these kinds of things are: Romanticism? Hypersyncretism? Or eclecticism? (I have never heard of or read of The White Goddess until you mentioned it.)

 
The White Goddess is another major influence on modern paganism, though with a publication date in the late 1940s it is closer to the end of the arc than the Romantic period itself (a hundred years earlier).  It is a poetic construction of veneration of a single goddess with many names, associated with lunar phases, as a posited core part of a universal goddess-cult focused around her and her son.

If anything, the harder polytheisms are primarily responding to modern "universalist" creations/interpretations which are given a false veneer of ancient standing.
as the water grinds the stone
we rise and fall
as our ashes turn to dust
we shine like stars    - Covenant, "Bullet"

Tags:
 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
56 Replies
4934 Views
Last post October 05, 2013, 09:43:32 pm
by Louisvillian
15 Replies
1964 Views
Last post December 05, 2013, 11:51:43 am
by Fireof9
36 Replies
5420 Views
Last post August 18, 2014, 04:52:11 am
by carillion
2 Replies
1502 Views
Last post January 07, 2016, 08:08:22 am
by RecycledBenedict
7 Replies
1729 Views
Last post August 26, 2015, 03:46:35 am
by StagTracker

* Who's Online

  • Dot Guests: 18
  • Dot Hidden: 0
  • Dot Users: 2
  • Dot Users Online:

* Please Donate!

The Cauldron's server is expensive and requires monthly payments. Please become a Bronze, Silver or Gold Donor if you can. Donations are needed every month. Without member support, we can't afford the server.

* In Memoriam

Chavi (2006)
Elspeth (2010)
Marilyn (2013)

* Cauldron Staff

Co-Hosts:
LyricFox & Randall

Senior Staff:
Darkhawk

Message Board Staff
Board Coordinator:
Sunflower

Assistant Board Coordinator:
Aster Breo

Board Staff:
Allaya, Chatelaine, HarpingHawke, Jenett, Morag, rocquelaire, Sefiru

Discord Chat Staff
Chat Coordinator:
Morag

Reserve Staff:
Aisling

Cauldron Council:
Bob, Catja, Emma-Eldritch, Fausta, Jubes, Kelly, Phouka, Sperran, Star, Steve, Tana

Cauldron Assistants
[Non-Staff Positions]

Site Assistants
[Non-Staff Positions]
Webmaster:
Randall