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Author Topic: Can your gods / goddesses die?  (Read 10679 times)

jess-foxx-quinn

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Re: Can your gods / goddesses die?
« Reply #60 on: September 26, 2014, 01:30:44 am »
In the Bowynn Pantheon there is only one tale of a god dying, Brand, God of brotherhood, oracles and hunting. And it was only through a weapon made by immortals. But he was also returned to the world of the living




Quote from: monsnoleedra;21975
Let me preface this with:  This is off the top of my head so not an in-depth look into any particular mythology! :stop:

................................................. ...........

Can your gods / goddesses die? That is a notion or question that occurred or came to me this morning. Sort of a companion question to the notions of gods / goddesses being immortal or semi-immortal and can they be injured like mortals.

As I pondered that, it occurred to me I am only aware of two pantheons that actually speak of such events occurring. The most apparent or visible examples recorded in the deaths of Osiris in the Egyptian mythos and that of Baldur in the Nordic mythos. I suppose for arguments sake one might add Jesus in the Christian mythos as he too is a divine being that died. Especially important is the fact that neither Baldur nor Osiris rose from the dead but where seen as truly being dead in my recall.

As added info one might also look to the Norse mythos with regards to Tyr being physically harmed through the loss of a hand and Odin sacrificing an eye for knowledge and wisdom.  Outside of those two examples I really cannot think of any other mythos that addresses such a position.  

One might equate the deaths of Baldur and Osiris as the dying king that fills a number of mythologies where the king and land are one. Perhaps even the death of Jesus in the same light of the king and land are one.  But to be honest that was not an avenue of consideration for my thoughts this morning.

But it also occurred to me that I cannot recall a single goddess that died in the myths. Truthfully, I can't even recall a single goddess that suffers the loss of any body part or perminate injury such as experienced by Tyr or Odin.

So on the surface it seemed as if only the Norse and Egyptian mythos even attempt to address a sense of mortality for their divinities.  Instances being found more in the Nordic pantheon than the Egyptian pantheon in regards to the number of examples of death and injury.  Then when one considers the end of times the Norse pantheon again acknowledges the physical death of a number of their gods, i.e. Thor who dies after slaying the mudguard serpent.

When I pause to consider the Greek pantheon one does not find death.  Not even when Cronus is eating his offspring do you truly see someone die.  When Prometheus is chained to the rock and his liver eaten everyday it does grow back.  Yet those seem to be the closest thing to a “Death” that I can think of in the Greek mythos.

Even in the mythos of the Native American’s I am familiar with I cannot think of the death or physical injury of any of the gods / goddess or spirits.

But as I stated at the beginning this is just off the top of my head this morning and not involving any dedicated type of research into the various mythos.  But it did seem like an important notion to be addressed.  A though I considered even if for no other reason than to consider or reflect upon the humanity and immortality of the very gods / goddesses.

So I ask, Can your gods / goddesses die?
Syalla!

Jainarayan

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Re: Can your gods / goddesses die?
« Reply #61 on: October 10, 2014, 03:13:22 pm »
Quote from: monsnoleedra;21975

Can your gods / goddesses die? That is a notion or question that occurred or came to me this morning. Sort of a companion question to the notions of gods / goddesses being immortal or semi-immortal and can they be injured like mortals.

 
Yes they can, in both my pantheons. The Aesir and Vanir will die in Ragnarok; Krishna was accidentally shot with an arrow and "gave up" his body; Uma (aka Sati for whom that horrid custom was named), Shiva's first wife gave up her body on a burning pyre after being humiliated by her father; Rama gave up his human form. In all those cases, however, a deity is either reborn or re-incarnates. The Aesir and Vanir are also supposed to be reborn in the new world. But yes, they can be injured and die.
śivāya vishnu rūpaya śivaḥ rūpaya vishnave
śivasya hridayam viṣṇur viṣṇoscha hridayam śivaḥ
Vishnu's appearance is Shiva; Shiva's appearance is Vishnu
Vishnu is the heart of Shiva; Shiva is the heart of Vishnu - Skandopanishad
 

Valeria Crowe

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Re: Can your gods / goddesses die?
« Reply #62 on: October 10, 2014, 03:21:21 pm »
Quote from: monsnoleedra;21975
Let me preface this with:  This is off the top of my head so not an in-depth look into any particular mythology! :stop:

................................................. ...........
So I ask, Can your gods / goddesses die?

 
As long as good men and women rebel against corrupt tyranny, as long as alcohol flows and people take pleasure in the joys of the flesh, as long as people live free in their heads and hearts, my god is eternal.
"This is a sorrow-spider. Which end do you hold it by? TRICK QUESTION!"

Maponos

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Re: Can your gods / goddesses die?
« Reply #63 on: October 12, 2014, 03:42:40 pm »
Quote from: monsnoleedra;21975
Let me preface this with:  This is off the top of my head so not an in-depth look into any particular mythology! :stop:

................................................. ...........

Can your gods / goddesses die? That is a notion or question that occurred or came to me this morning. Sort of a companion question to the notions of gods / goddesses being immortal or semi-immortal and can they be injured like mortals.

As I pondered that, it occurred to me I am only aware of two pantheons that actually speak of such events occurring. The most apparent or visible examples recorded in the deaths of Osiris in the Egyptian mythos and that of Baldur in the Nordic mythos. I suppose for arguments sake one might add Jesus in the Christian mythos as he too is a divine being that died. Especially important is the fact that neither Baldur nor Osiris rose from the dead but where seen as truly being dead in my recall.

As added info one might also look to the Norse mythos with regards to Tyr being physically harmed through the loss of a hand and Odin sacrificing an eye for knowledge and wisdom.  Outside of those two examples I really cannot think of any other mythos that addresses such a position.  

One might equate the deaths of Baldur and Osiris as the dying king that fills a number of mythologies where the king and land are one. Perhaps even the death of Jesus in the same light of the king and land are one.  But to be honest that was not an avenue of consideration for my thoughts this morning.

But it also occurred to me that I cannot recall a single goddess that died in the myths. Truthfully, I can't even recall a single goddess that suffers the loss of any body part or perminate injury such as experienced by Tyr or Odin.

So on the surface it seemed as if only the Norse and Egyptian mythos even attempt to address a sense of mortality for their divinities.  Instances being found more in the Nordic pantheon than the Egyptian pantheon in regards to the number of examples of death and injury.  Then when one considers the end of times the Norse pantheon again acknowledges the physical death of a number of their gods, i.e. Thor who dies after slaying the mudguard serpent.

When I pause to consider the Greek pantheon one does not find death.  Not even when Cronus is eating his offspring do you truly see someone die.  When Prometheus is chained to the rock and his liver eaten everyday it does grow back.  Yet those seem to be the closest thing to a “Death” that I can think of in the Greek mythos.

Even in the mythos of the Native American’s I am familiar with I cannot think of the death or physical injury of any of the gods / goddess or spirits.

But as I stated at the beginning this is just off the top of my head this morning and not involving any dedicated type of research into the various mythos.  But it did seem like an important notion to be addressed.  A though I considered even if for no other reason than to consider or reflect upon the humanity and immortality of the very gods / goddesses.

So I ask, Can your gods / goddesses die?

 
We cannot say with certainty whether or not the gods truly die or die as we know it. If you look at mythology, you will still find people worshipping deities that have said to have 'died', but do they truly 'die'?

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