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Author Topic: Pagan Pilgrimage?  (Read 3150 times)

KonJelen

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Re: Pagan Pilgrimage?
« Reply #15 on: July 08, 2014, 03:33:20 am »
Quote from: Redfaery;152287
I saw that Meiji Shrine was not too far, but I don't feel any need to bother the Tenno. Yasukuni is on my list simply because it is extremely close to where I'll be attending class, and I think it'll be a good idea to stop in and say hello to the kami there, since I feel like I'll be on their turf.

(...) I'd certainly love to go to a shrine to Ame no Uzume, since she was the kami I did work with. We went our separate ways, but she was very polite and patient with me, until she finally just went "look, you don't need me. You've got someone better."

Speaking of which, I'd love, love, love to find a shrine to Benzaiten! (...)


Hello! I'm currently studying in Tokyo, and I've been interested in Shinto for quite some time, so I thought I'd reply to this thread.

Firstly, I'd like to say I totally understand your "freaking out", that's how I felt, too... But don't worry, everything's gonna be fine - and really, really interesting:)

As for the deities you mentioned, I see you've been already referenced to a list of Benzaiten shrines, but perhaps I, too, could add a little bit...

The Japanese wiki has a fine list of main Buddhist temples and Shinto shrines dedicated to Benzaiten. Among the Tokyo ones it lists:

- Bentendo pavilion of the Kan'ei-ji temple in Ueno, Taito ward (Sisu's link also mentions it, in relation to the Shinobazu pond).
Wiki link about the temple: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kan%27ei-ji
Japanese site about Bentendo, with photos:  http://www.geocities.jp/henatool/hakubutu/sinobazu/bentendo.html
BTW, Bentendo stages "Minarukane-taisai" - a snake-and-gold-related festival - each September, when the Day of the Snake (巳の日, acc. to the 12-animal calendar cycle 十二支) and the Day of Fulfillment (not sure that's the right translation?? 成の日, from the 12-stages calendar cycle 十二直) overlap. In 2014, that would be Sept. 19th. I haven't been there, but sounds interesting:)

- Benten-dokutsu (The grotto of Benten) in the Inagi town, Tokyo pref. Wiki says it's been dug 1500 years ago.
http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/弁天洞窟

- Inokashira Benzaiten (that's been covered by Siso's link)

- Ryoho-ji temple in the Hachioji town, Tokyo pref. For some reason it has an exceedingly, er, kawaii design?..:ange:
http://ryohoji.jp/top.html/

I've also found a link about Tokyo shrines dedicated to the "Seven Gods of Luck" (Shichifukujin) of whom Benzaiten is considered a part, with addresses and all, listed by the Tokyo wards they're situated in. It's in Japanese, and it's only dedicated to those shrines and temples which are close to the shrines of other Gods of Luck, so I'm not sure how helpful it would be, but here it is: http://www.asahi-net.or.jp/~uy7m-ssk/tokyo.htm

I don't know which ward you'll be staying in, but you mentioned that your classes are in general vicinity of Yasukuni, so I thought I'd also list places from the above link which fall into the somewhere-vaguely-near-Yasukuni area:

- Itsukushima (Miyajima) shrine in Shinjuku (I suppose it's a branch shrine of THE Miyajima shrine in Hiroshima...). It's situated somewhere near "Higashi-Shinjuku" metro station of the Oedo line. (I see the English link Sisu provided also lists an Itsukushima shine, but that one's in Nerima ward. I suppose there are several of them...)
http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/厳嶋神社_(新宿区)

- Tokuunji Buddhist temple in Bunkyo ward, which venerates Buddha Shakyamuni and has a side little shrine for Benzaiten. It's near Myogadani st. of the Marunouchi metro line.
http://www.tesshow.jp/bunkyo/temple_kohinata_tokuun.html

Apart from all those, I've also stumbled upon a Japanese article about different Benten shrines:
http://cues.cc/clog/縁結び/第102回「巳成金大祭」/

Among those listed there, these are in Tokyo:

- Bentendo pavilion of the Asakusa temple (http://www.senso-ji.jp/guide/bentendo.html)

- Hosho-Benzaiten (宝生辨財天) in the Suitengu shrine in Chuo ward (http://www.suitengu.or.jp/site/)

- An'yo-ji temple in Shinjuku. Its main object of worship is Kannon, and it has a tiny Benzaiten shrine.
http://kagurazaka.yamamogura.com/tag/宝生弁財天/

- Koami shrine in Nihonbashi, Chuo ward. It also venerates Inari.
http://www.koamijinja.or.jp/history.html

- Iwaya-Benten in the Banryu-ji temple in Meguro ward.
http://www.imeyes.com/02meguro/meg7fuku2.html

- Toyokawa Inari Tokyo-betsu-in in Minato ward, which is dedicated to Inari, but has a little side shrine for Benten.
http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/豊川稲荷東京別院
http://www.toyokawainari-tokyo.jp/images/precincts/img16p.jpg

- Bentendo of the Kongo-ji temple in the Hino town, Tokyo pref.
http://www.takahatafudoson.or.jp/?page_id=13

As for Ama-no-Uzume, I actually kind of adore her, but her shrines are not easy to find. Sometimes she's venerated in a side shrine near Amaterasu, sometimes - near her husband, Sarutahiko. Her shrines are usually called Miyabi-jinja (宮比神社).
I don't believe I ever stumbled upon one of her shrines IRL, but I'm saving all the links about them that I can find:)
Wiki lists her main shrines as: Togakushi shrine in Nagano pref., Ozoso shrine in Mie pref., Aratate shrine in Miyazaki pref., Tsukudo-Hachiman shrine in Tokyo, Shinjuku, and Hyotan-yama Inari shrine in Osaka pref. Judging by the shrine names, Ama-no-Uzume's are probably side shrines there.

There's also Tsubaki Grand Shrine in Mie pref., dedicated to Sarutahiko and Ama-no-Uzume.
Its wiki article in English: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsubaki_Grand_Shrine
- is a stub, but actually features an interesting link to a book called "The Way of the Kami: The Life And Thought Of A Shinto Priest" by Guji Yukitaka Yamamoto:)
A photo of the Uzume shrine of Tsubaki: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ja/5/52/Uzume-honguu_shrine.jpg

- Ama-no-iwato shrine in Miyazaki pref., dedicated to the myth of Amaterasu hiding in a cave. It has this nice statue of Uzume: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6a/Uzume.jpg/640px-Uzume.jpg

Well, that's all I can help you with, I suppose. Although, as for the Meiji shrine, if you are staying anywhere near it, I'd also recommend to give it a try. It has great soothing atmosphere (or at least that's what I felt) and lots of greenery, too:) (A little cafe by the side of the main walkway also sells tasty takoyaki!:D: )
The shrine houses not only the Meiji emperor's spirit, but also the empress Shoken's, who founded the Japanese Red Cross, created a fund for the International Red Cross, and also promoted women's education. (She actually had some anniversary in April, I think, so they did a gallery about her life along the main walkway, which is how I learned all this stuff:ange: ).
I actually had some major reservations about the whole "worshipping the emperor" thing, and had no intention of going to this shrine myself, but once stumbled upon it completely out of the blue, and in the end was glad I went there. I don't expect you to feel the same, of course, just... thought of adding yet another perspective:)

As for Yasukuni, I've read opinions that it's not so much the shrine that is so controversial as the revisionist Yushukan museum near it. That's still a curious place to visit, I think... It's far from me, though, so I haven't.
...I've checked its English site, and the Yushukan page has some interesting phrasing:ange:

...Also completely unrelated, but Sisu mentioned northern Japan.
There's a festival in Aomori pref. this month during the 20-24th, called Osore-zan Taisai (it's held every year; there's also an autumn festival, but I don't know the dates). It's on the mount Osore, which is considered an entryway either to hell or to the otherworld in general. During the festival, lots of people go there to meet with the itako, who are women with the ability to horse spirits of the dead.

It is thought that the itako were historically blind women who chose this profession because otherwise they couldn't provide for themselves. As time progressed, new alternatives arose, and the need to go through years of hard ascetic training to be able to become itako has all but disappeared, and the number of itako has diminished dramatically. It's thought to be a dying tradition now. Anyway, I'm thinking to go there this year, and I thought this info might be interesting to other people, too..

BTW, the temple on Osore, Bodai-ji, venerates Jizo (Ksitigarbha), but it's also the last of the 33 destinations for the "Tanabe seashore Kannon pilgrimage", traditional in the Shimokita peninsula.

Some links in English about Osore festival and itako:
http://wikitravel.org/en/Mount_Osore
http://wkdfestivalsaijiki.blogspot.jp/2011/10/osozezan-festival.html

And, in Japanese, about 33 places of Kannon pilgrimage:
http://www.pref.aomori.lg.jp/bunka/kanko/sh_renkei_gururin_kannon.html

PS: Sorry for any inadequacies or threadjacks, I'm a total n00b who's been lurking on this forum for a month or two, but never found anything meaningful to say that would warrant finally registering... And now I did find something I actually can be helpful with... I think. Oh joy:ashamed:

Sisu

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Re: Pagan Pilgrimage?
« Reply #16 on: July 08, 2014, 08:52:17 am »
Quote from: KonJelen;152529


- Ama-no-iwato shrine in Miyazaki pref., dedicated to the myth of Amaterasu hiding in a cave. It has this nice statue of Uzume: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6a/Uzume.jpg/640px-Uzume.jpg .....


...Also completely unrelated, but Sisu mentioned northern Japan.
There's a festival in Aomori pref. this month during the 20-24th, called Osore-zan Taisai (it's held every year; there's also an autumn festival, but I don't know the dates). It's on the mount Osore, which is considered an entryway either to hell or to the otherworld in general. During the festival, lots of people go there to meet with the itako, who are women with the ability to horse spirits of the dead.

 
First off, thanks for all the detailed info! I didn't post any links in Japanese since I didn't know her level in the language (or any other person who may be viewing this thread), but I'm sure there's a lot more info out there in Japanese as seems like it's a bit difficult to track down reliable information on Shinto in English.

I'd been wondering for a while if anyone had bothered to go looking for Amaterasu's cave (or whether there was a culture of artifact-finding/myth-related archaeology as there is in other religions). I had asked some Japanese people that I'm friends with and no on had any clue (I've actually found a lot of Japanese people to be fairly ignorant of Shinto -- but this isn't terribly surprising given their general stance on religion). Googling it in Japanese finally gave me my answer, but does anyone know of any translators or scholars who have taken up the task of researching/translating texts and information about Shinto into English?

KonJelen

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Re: Pagan Pilgrimage?
« Reply #17 on: July 08, 2014, 08:26:21 pm »
Quote from: Sisu;152545
First off, thanks for all the detailed info! I didn't post any links in Japanese since I didn't know her level in the language (or any other person who may be viewing this thread), but I'm sure there's a lot more info out there in Japanese as seems like it's a bit difficult to track down reliable information on Shinto in English.

I'd been wondering for a while if anyone had bothered to go looking for Amaterasu's cave (or whether there was a culture of artifact-finding/myth-related archaeology as there is in other religions). I had asked some Japanese people that I'm friends with and no on had any clue (I've actually found a lot of Japanese people to be fairly ignorant of Shinto -- but this isn't terribly surprising given their general stance on religion). Googling it in Japanese finally gave me my answer, but does anyone know of any translators or scholars who have taken up the task of researching/translating texts and information about Shinto into English?

 
You're welcome! I wasn't sure about the language level thing too, actually that's why I translated the important parts into English. The Japanese links are there mainly to show sources, and to supply visual info. Furthermore, if a person finds something to be of special interest to them, maybe knowing how the names etc. look in kanji will help, too... Those were my thoughts, anyway. (I also thought of offering further translation if needed, but was a little cautious that it could be seen as patronizing..? Like, assuming they need help when they actually don't? I'm a bit dense about such things. Anyway, I'm not that good at Japanese myself, but I am willing to help.)

As for the English works on Shinto, I've seen a few English-language books in the university library... "Shinto: the Kami Way" by Sokyo Ono is by far the most known, I guess.
...Actually, your question spurred me to finally do what I wanted to do for quite some time:) So, I've just done a search in the OPAC catalogue of Tokyo univ (it's their English version) on "shinto", and surprisingly got quite a lot of hits in English and French. Thank you, now I have a lot to work on:)
(To me, searching OPAC is a good way to make a personal booklist for the later research. My usual way from there is googling the titles I got and seeing whether they are relevant to what I look for etc.)

As for the online sources, I've found that Kokugakuin univ. does (or did?) a lot of work on bringing the info on Shinto to the English-speaking audience.
Here is one of their projects, Encyclopedia of Shinto
They also published Contemporary papers on Japanese religion online.
That's all I know, anyway...

Sisu

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Re: Pagan Pilgrimage?
« Reply #18 on: July 10, 2014, 08:42:09 am »
Quote from: KonJelen;152599


As for the English works on Shinto, I've seen a few English-language books in the university library... "Shinto: the Kami Way" by Sokyo Ono is by far the most known, I guess.
...Actually, your question spurred me to finally do what I wanted to do for quite some time:) So, I've just done a search in the OPAC catalogue of Tokyo univ (it's their English version) on "shinto", and surprisingly got quite a lot of hits in English and French. Thank you, now I have a lot to work on:)
(To me, searching OPAC is a good way to make a personal booklist for the later research. My usual way from there is googling the titles I got and seeing whether they are relevant to what I look for etc.)

As for the online sources, I've found that Kokugakuin univ. does (or did?) a lot of work on bringing the info on Shinto to the English-speaking audience.
Here is one of their projects, Encyclopedia of Shinto
They also published Contemporary papers on Japanese religion online.
That's all I know, anyway...


Thanks! I didn't know about those sites so I'll be reading through them over the next few days. I may even include them on a list of resources I give my Japanese-language students since they often have questions about it and/or want to get the most out of their visits to shrines when they go to Japan.
I'd be interested in helping people translate whatever articles, etc. they're interested in from Japanese (time permitting). :)

Redfaery

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Re: Pagan Pilgrimage?
« Reply #19 on: July 11, 2014, 03:05:18 am »
Quote from: KonJelen;152529
Hello! I'm currently studying in Tokyo, and I've been interested in Shinto for quite some time, so I thought I'd reply to this thread.

....

As for the deities you mentioned, I see you've been already referenced to a list of Benzaiten shrines, but perhaps I, too, could add a little bit...

 
You are awesome. That is all. *tosses internet cupcakes as reward*
KARMA: You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

Redfaery

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Re: Pagan Pilgrimage?
« Reply #20 on: July 11, 2014, 03:08:19 am »
Quote from: KonJelen;152599

As for the English works on Shinto, I've seen a few English-language books in the university library... "Shinto: the Kami Way" by Sokyo Ono is by far the most known, I guess.

 
I have that one. There are others though, that are better. I would recommend Shinto: the Way Home by Thomas P. Kasulis. (I think his first name is Thomas? Not sure. Last name is definitely Kasulis). It's a much more philosophical approach to Shinto. Also, you can easily find a book of Shinto Norito put out by Tsubaki Grand shrine in Washington State, here in the US.
KARMA: You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

KonJelen

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Re: Pagan Pilgrimage?
« Reply #21 on: July 13, 2014, 12:02:13 am »
Quote from: Redfaery;152731
You are awesome. That is all. *tosses internet cupcakes as reward*

 
Aww, thanks!:) *happily munches on a cupcake*

Quote from: Redfaery;152732
I have that one. There are others though, that are better. (...)


"The kami way" is probably the only book dedicated to Shinto that I've ever read (I mean, I've read articles on Shinto and some books on Japanese culture, religion and supernatural things, but that's not exactly the same).
I agree that there most probably are better books out there (I haven't read the ones you mentioned, but I'm going to check them out, too!), but when I read it, I thought it was quite helpful in laying out the bare basics of what is what and who is who and how is... how? - in Shinto, as well as in giving a general feel of a Shintoist mindset. I remember taking notes vigorously while reading:) Although I understand that the author mainly speaks from the stance of Shrine Shinto, and also that Shinto itself doesn't have a strict belief and conduct system, so the author's personal biases are always going to show in such topics...

...Ah, I actually found the notes! Here are some examples of the mindset-related stuff as described by Sokyo Ono that impressed me back then (some of them I thought of as beautiful, others - simply peculiar):
- "people should be worshipped as kami" (although apparently shouldn't be called such until after they die), people are theoretically regarded as kami in order that they may try their best in life;
- thinking of a live person as a kami is connected with "the power of words (kotodama), which can bring about a transformation in [the person's] character";
- there is no one absolute Creator deity, but "The creative function of the world is realized through the harmonious cooperation of the kami in the performance of their respective missions";
- "Daily life is regarded as "service to the kami", that is, as matsuri...";
- shrine worship is a means of maintaining harmony between the kami and therefore harmony of the world; harmony and cooperation are fundamental to Shinto;
- shrine worship is seen as "transcending rather than conflicting with the acceptance of another religious faith". "Not only is there no objection on the part of shrines to their parishioners being adherents of [...] some other religion; it is assumed that they will";
- it's considered taboo "to look upon the spirits of the other world" (I guess that comes from the myth of Izanagi looking at Izanami in the Underworld despite her warnings?.. Anyway, now I wonder where that leaves the itako and other mediums);
- a person's purpose in life consists in "realizing hopes and ideals of ancestors";
- good and evil are relative and depend on circumstances (this includes killing), but everything that causes misfortune or disturbs social order is evil, and all evil is caused by spirits from "outside" of the world, because the world and people are inherently good (and here I think: but... Susanoo, for ex., disturbed social order and brought misfortune to Amaterasu and her servants, too, and he wasn't possessed by otherworldly spirits, was he?..);
- by exorcising spirits and thus "restoring the original nature" of a person, one restores their inherent capacity to be good and do good;
- "The world of the kami does not transcend that of man, and man does not need to seek to enter a divine [...] world to attain salvation. He seeks salvation by bringing the kami in this world, and salvation is attained in the harmonious development of the world";
- "life is good, death is evil".
As for this last one, I'm very curious about the role of Izanami. According to myth, Izanami, who was (and is) regarded as the mother of Japan, became the ruler of the Underworld after her death... And she's still venerated in shrines all across the country. But is she ever venerated as a death goddess? I'm currently searching the net for the answer and finding very little info. She's often venerated alongside Izanagi and prayed to for peaceful development of the country, marriage, health, prosperity and safety (sometimes specifically - fire safety).
One of her main shrines, Hibayama-Kume in Shimane pref., specializes in safe birth.

There also apparently exist modern interpretations that she was in reality a member of a rival clan/tribe/country and didn't die but returned home, and therefore "Yomi-no kuni" is not an underworld but a foreign land.
There's also a version that Izanagi is really Adam, and Izanami is Lilith who went on to marry Satan and birth monsters...:eek:

Also, there is some info that the "Hakusan shrines" (named after mount Hakusan between Ishikawa and Gifu prefs), which venerate Izanagi, Izanami and Kukuri-hime, were especilly popular among the discriminated groups, who considered Izanami their patroness of sorts, because she was traditionally seen as bearing the "contamination" of death, similar to how they were seen as bearing some kind of "contamination", too...

...Hmm, now I've found something else about death, too! Apart from Osore-zan, there's apparently another place regarded as the entrance to hell, situated in Shimane pref. and connected to the Izanami legend. There's a shrine to Izanami nearby, called Iya-jinja, which holds strong associations with death... However, apart from "strong associations" and it being on the border between life and death, I found no more info on this.

(While searching, I've also stumbled upon a blog whose author translates old myths into modern Japanese, and there was an entry about Izanami's birthing of Kagutsuchi and her resulting death, and it had the most creepily/sacrilegiously/adorably (?) hilarious illustration to go with it xD)

BTW, Sokyo Ono also writes that the mirror before the inner sanctuary of Yasukuni is a gift from emperor Meiji, so there's your Meiji-jingu link, too:)
Did a search about this and found an interesting article:

Social Memory as Ritual Practice: Commemorating Spirits of the Military Dead at Yasukuni Shinto Shrine (PDF) by John Nelson
Curious bit about Shinto rituals: "While it is common to assume particular deities reside at shrines, priests consistently inform me it would be too difficult and dangerous to manage a prolonged presence; thus the deities are called on to participate and then invited to depart at the end of the proceedings (see Nelson 1996a, 2000). To my knowledge, Yasukuni Shrine is exceptional in that the spirits are thought to be continually housed at the shrine."

Sorry, I'm not even sure why I've written all that... apart from the fact that I find this interesting, and that it gives me an excuse to procrastinate from my exam preparation studies...:(

KonJelen

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Re: Pagan Pilgrimage?
« Reply #22 on: July 13, 2014, 12:17:03 am »
Quote from: Sisu;152655
Thanks! I didn't know about those sites so I'll be reading through them over the next few days. I may even include them on a list of resources I give my Japanese-language students since they often have questions about it and/or want to get the most out of their visits to shrines when they go to Japan.
I'd be interested in helping people translate whatever articles, etc. they're interested in from Japanese (time permitting). :)


I've been recently browsing a Russian site on folklore research, and found two short articles in English on some aspects and details of Japanese myth. They are not anything special, but curious nonetheless, so I though maybe I'd post the links here, too, in case you were interested:

"Naming and Seeing Things in Early Japanese Poetry" by L.M. Ermakova
(it's about "mythological notion of seeing" as a magical act)

"Austronesian parallels in "Kojiki" and Indo-Pacific sources of "folk Christianity"" by Yuri Berezkin
(about the migration of the motif of a divine couple first giving birth to disfigured children/spirits/reptiles after a wrongly conducted marriage ceremony, and then, having re-married correctly, - to "normal" children)

Also, here's a blog I've just found of an American member of JET program in Matsue who does manga retellings of Kojiki:D: (I mentioned her article about Iya jinja in the above reply to Redfaery, too)

Redfaery

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Re: Pagan Pilgrimage?
« Reply #23 on: July 15, 2014, 07:38:43 am »
Quote from: KonJelen;152831
Aww, thanks!:) *happily munches on a cupcake*

 
*looks at long post* Dayum, you did your research. *chucks another cupcake.*
KARMA: You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

Sisu

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Re: Pagan Pilgrimage?
« Reply #24 on: July 15, 2014, 02:25:43 pm »
Quote from: Redfaery;152958
*looks at long post* Dayum, you did your research. *chucks another cupcake.*

 
Yeah, good job hitting the ball way outta the park :D:

KonJelen

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Re: Pagan Pilgrimage?
« Reply #25 on: July 15, 2014, 07:06:01 pm »
Quote from: Redfaery;152958
*looks at long post* Dayum, you did your research. *chucks another cupcake.*

 
Quote from: Sisu;152989
Yeah, good job hitting the ball way outta the park :D:

 
Well, sorry. That seems to happen to me a lot...
Thought that infodump might be interesting not only to me, but if not, I apologize for the massive thread derailment:ninja:

Sisu

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Re: Pagan Pilgrimage?
« Reply #26 on: July 15, 2014, 11:31:52 pm »
Quote from: KonJelen;153014
Well, sorry. That seems to happen to me a lot...
Thought that infodump might be interesting not only to me, but if not, I apologize for the massive thread derailment:ninja:

 
I meant what I said as a compliment :) I haven't come across such good info on Shinto in this forum in a while

KonJelen

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Re: Pagan Pilgrimage?
« Reply #27 on: July 16, 2014, 06:27:14 am »
Quote from: Sisu;153031
I meant what I said as a compliment :) I haven't come across such good info on Shinto in this forum in a while

 
Oh. Then it's just a case of me being paranoid. :o I do tend to get carried away big time, and I understand that my waxing (un)poetic about something or other isn't always exactly called for... the thing is, I often understand that a bit too late :ashamed:
And thanks for the compliment!
...Um, right, so to make this post less about my social failings and more about actual Shinto, I'll leave you yet another link!:whis:
Fully downloadable issues of the "Japanese Journal of Religious Studies" from the Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture (years 1960-2014)

Redfaery

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Re: Pagan Pilgrimage?
« Reply #28 on: July 16, 2014, 06:54:35 am »
Quote from: KonJelen;153046
Oh. Then it's just a case of me being paranoid. :o I do tend to get carried away big time, and I understand that my waxing (un)poetic about something or other isn't always exactly called for... the thing is, I often understand that a bit too late :ashamed:
And thanks for the compliment!
...Um, right, so to make this post less about my social failings and more about actual Shinto, I'll leave you yet another link!:whis:
Fully downloadable issues of the "Japanese Journal of Religious Studies" from the Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture (years 1960-2014)


Yep. You're doin' well. Don't apologize. I understand about social awkwardness. I have autism, so I'm always second-guessing what other people mean. In this case, just take the cupcakes. ;)
KARMA: You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

Redfaery

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Re: Pagan Pilgrimage?
« Reply #29 on: July 19, 2014, 02:22:51 am »
Quote from: KonJelen;152529
- Inokashira Benzaiten (that's been covered by Siso's link)

I just got back from this one. It's actually about a ten minute walk from my hotel! I wish I'd looked here first, because I would've skipped the trip to the Gasshoji if I'd known before...It's not marked on any maps or on any of the signs. It just kind of pops up all of a sudden, this bright red thing with green tiles that just goes HELLO!

I wandered in, thinking it might've been the Inari shrine that was on the park map (right next to Benten bridge, which was my first clue), but nope. No foxes anywhere...but a lot of snakes! Yep, it was Benten. There's no Torii or purification pavilion. It's pretty clearly a Buddhist chapel.
KARMA: You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

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