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Author Topic: Current books on Herbal healing and books on Mythology and Folklore  (Read 403 times)

RitaCeleste

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Okay, my herbal healing has gotten really out of date.  If I have any books left they are old.  Also I wanted to read some books on mythology and folklore.  I love fairy folklore that has older and darker fey stories.  I also wanted to read the stories of the Goddess that Wicca is based on.  I like a good story.

RitaCeleste

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Re: Current books on Herbal healing and books on Mythology and Folklore
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2018, 03:53:00 pm »
Okay, my herbal healing has gotten really out of date.  If I have any books left they are old.  Also, I wanted to read some books on mythology and folklore.  I love fairy folklore that has older and darker fey stories.  I also wanted to read the stories of the Goddess that Wicca is based on.  I like a good story.

I ended up picking this older book up for herbs A Modern Herbal by Margret Grieve Vol 1 and 2 for the Kindle.  As far as the rest, I have a large collection of free fairytale books like the Blue Fairy book to read already.  I'll dig around and see if I can find a good book of myths from different locations.

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Re: Current books on Herbal healing and books on Mythology and Folklore
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2018, 11:58:50 am »
I ended up picking this older book up for herbs A Modern Herbal by Margret Grieve Vol 1 and 2 for the Kindle.

I'll note here that this book is also available on the Web for free.

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RitaCeleste

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Re: Current books on Herbal healing and books on Mythology and Folklore
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2018, 08:48:28 am »
I'll note here that this book is also available on the Web for free.

Sunflower

Good to know.  I think most of my research lately has involved googling the ailment and what gel caps in what dose to buy.  This has actually worked well.  This book is so old, I'd probably have a problem if I tried to use it like I used books in the past.

My mom had a copy of this when I was a teen. 
Herbs and Things: A Compendium of Practical and Exotic Herbal Lore Paperback – June 25, 1979
by Jeanne Rose (Author)

I referenced and read this book to death.  I am sure it is so dated as to prove useless but still kinda want a copy.

RitaCeleste

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Re: Current books on Herbal healing and books on Mythology and Folklore
« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2018, 09:12:53 am »
Good to know.  I think most of my research lately has involved googling the ailment and what gel caps in what dose to buy.  This has actually worked well.  This book is so old, I'd probably have a problem if I tried to use it like I used books in the past.

My mom had a copy of this when I was a teen. 
Herbs and Things: A Compendium of Practical and Exotic Herbal Lore Paperback – June 25, 1979
by Jeanne Rose (Author)

I referenced and read this book to death.  I am sure it is so dated as to prove useless but still kinda want a copy.

Actually, this was the book I used as a young adult
The Way of Herbs Kindle Edition
by Michael Tierra (Author)

I broke down and got it for the Kindle.  I also got some really cheap kindle books of old fairy tales. Grimms, Andrew Lang, etc.  Found some very old free books on mythology Celtic and Norse.

I am favoring the Kindle for books.  Moving around over the years, I always loose books.  Anything important I want stuck to my Amazon account forever.

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Re: Current books on Herbal healing and books on Mythology and Folklore
« Reply #5 on: December 04, 2018, 09:21:09 am »
Good to know.  I think most of my research lately has involved googling the ailment and what gel caps in what dose to buy.  This has actually worked well.  This book is so old, I'd probably have a problem if I tried to use it like I used books in the past.

one big issue with older herbals (and this applies to anything more than the past few years, but especially things like Maud Grieves!) is that there is a lot of important safety information missing.

Some of this is related to modern prescription medications (there are a lot of contraindications, as well as things that may affect how medications are absorbed), but some of it is about having a better understanding of medical information in general, and how herbs affect our bodies.

I recommend running any herbal doses through a modern and regularly updated source. I usually start with the individual herb information pages at Mountain Rose Herbs. (For example, here is the one for St. John's Wort, which has a number of interactions. I also usually do a search for the name of the herb (Latin name, by preference) and words like "caution" or "interaction" or "safety".
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RitaCeleste

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Re: Current books on Herbal healing and books on Mythology and Folklore
« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2018, 11:26:27 am »
one big issue with older herbals (and this applies to anything more than the past few years, but especially things like Maud Grieves!) is that there is a lot of important safety information missing.

Some of this is related to modern prescription medications (there are a lot of contraindications, as well as things that may affect how medications are absorbed), but some of it is about having a better understanding of medical information in general, and how herbs affect our bodies.

I recommend running any herbal doses through a modern and regularly updated source. I usually start with the individual herb information pages at Mountain Rose Herbs. (For example, here is the one for St. John's Wort, which has a number of interactions. I also usually do a search for the name of the herb (Latin name, by preference) and words like "caution" or "interaction" or "safety".

Thanks so much for pointing that out.  I am Bipolar and I can tell you St John's Wart is not the one for me.  But I did recommend it to a friend going through a bad divorce.  So often you have check and cross check with med websites to make sure about each med a person is on.  I take DHEA sorta irregularly and I have to know it could make me manic or make my med less effective.  The internet makes it possible to be so much better at fixing people without hurting them but you have to do the research.

RitaCeleste

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Re: Current books on Herbal healing and books on Mythology and Folklore
« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2018, 11:59:14 am »
one big issue with older herbals (and this applies to anything more than the past few years, but especially things like Maud Grieves!) is that there is a lot of important safety information missing.

Some of this is related to modern prescription medications (there are a lot of contraindications, as well as things that may affect how medications are absorbed), but some of it is about having a better understanding of medical information in general, and how herbs affect our bodies.

I recommend running any herbal doses through a modern and regularly updated source. I usually start with the individual herb information pages at Mountain Rose Herbs. (For example, here is the one for St. John's Wort, which has a number of interactions. I also usually do a search for the name of the herb (Latin name, by preference) and words like "caution" or "interaction" or "safety".

I think there is no easy buy a book solution.  Books can provide a starting point. (How did I learn about DHEA in the first place?)  You want to search also on the ailment itself as new things may be available.  Really I think it is key to learn how to understand what you are reading when a plant is described or a medicine.  Reading helps you learn the vocabulary.  Most of the people that know to ask me or a family member do so because we can read and understand things that are greek to them.  Or latin more often.  Also paying attention to what can be had from local stores like a Walmart, CVS, Walgreens and what is going to be a special order online.  DHEA was a special order.  And you have to ask yourself, "Will Bob bother to take this 4 times per day?"  It only works if they are willing to take the cure.

RitaCeleste

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Re: Current books on Herbal healing and books on Mythology and Folklore
« Reply #8 on: December 04, 2018, 03:44:49 pm »
one big issue with older herbals (and this applies to anything more than the past few years, but especially things like Maud Grieves!) is that there is a lot of important safety information missing.

Some of this is related to modern prescription medications (there are a lot of contraindications, as well as things that may affect how medications are absorbed), but some of it is about having a better understanding of medical information in general, and how herbs affect our bodies.

I recommend running any herbal doses through a modern and regularly updated source. I usually start with the individual herb information pages at Mountain Rose Herbs. (For example, here is the one for St. John's Wort, which has a number of interactions. I also usually do a search for the name of the herb (Latin name, by preference) and words like "caution" or "interaction" or "safety".

After reading some of the content online from the books by  Maud Grieves, I returned them.  I listed defective content as the reason.  The information is not what I need to know about the plants.  There is more misinformation than information I think.  I have some texts with old folk remedies, some had merit, some nada.  But in that case, I expected that.

What I was looking for was something like The Way of Herbs by Michael Tierra.  I can find out the actual properties of an herb and what systems in the body are affected if I remember correctly.  I used this book quite a bit and loved the way it read. 

If anyone has used a book organized like this and with this type of information but more up to date, please, please let me know.  The book is probably 25 years old, but it is the best one I know of.  There should be a newer book by now with more products making their way to market listed.

Noctua

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Re: Current books on Herbal healing and books on Mythology and Folklore
« Reply #9 on: December 04, 2018, 06:32:46 pm »
I think there is no easy buy a book solution.  Books can provide a starting point. (How did I learn about DHEA in the first place?)  You want to search also on the ailment itself as new things may be available.  Really I think it is key to learn how to understand what you are reading when a plant is described or a medicine.  Reading helps you learn the vocabulary.  Most of the people that know to ask me or a family member do so because we can read and understand things that are greek to them.  Or latin more often.  Also paying attention to what can be had from local stores like a Walmart, CVS, Walgreens and what is going to be a special order online.  DHEA was a special order.  And you have to ask yourself, "Will Bob bother to take this 4 times per day?"  It only works if they are willing to take the cure.

Just curious why you were taking the DHEA. I'm taking that one myself (prescribed by my endocrinologist, I was symptomatic and my DHEA-S levels were almost unmeasurable) and I hate the side effects of it so much, I can't imagine someone wanting to take it. I've actually just cut down my dose to half of what was prescribed because I was so miserable.

Also I hate to be nit-picky but I wouldn't count DHEA as falling under herbalism, since it's a human prohormone. :)

RitaCeleste

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Re: Current books on Herbal healing and books on Mythology and Folklore
« Reply #10 on: December 04, 2018, 08:30:55 pm »
Just curious why you were taking the DHEA. I'm taking that one myself (prescribed by my endocrinologist, I was symptomatic and my DHEA-S levels were almost unmeasurable) and I hate the side effects of it so much, I can't imagine someone wanting to take it. I've actually just cut down my dose to half of what was prescribed because I was so miserable.

Also I hate to be nit-picky but I wouldn't count DHEA as falling under herbalism, since it's a human prohormone. :)

I use what works and what is available.  My grandfather was a doctor.  My parents worked for him, but my father was a Biologist and mother had a major in accounting and minor in Biology( She says she minored in dad.). My grandmother and great-aunt were trained as nurses.  Medicine was how they escaped poverty. 

I use plants and vitamins and supplements as medicine.  Medicine is medicine.  Results are what matters, along with cost and ease of use.  My goal is helping people.  Whatever works.  Whatever they can afford.  Whatever they will actually do.  If you can't afford it, it does not help you.  If you will not take it, it does not help you.

I detest people who want to treat my bipolar disorder with herbs when the best thing for me is a med that is affordable.  My mother and father fall into that category.  I was the child suffering with no meds because of their ideals.  What did their ideals cost them? They did not need the treatments they denied me.

I am 45 and after a long illness due to an undiagnosed wheat allergy, I developed a condition.  The man in the boat gave up, got out of the boat and went in the house and locked the door.  I had to use hormone cream to lure him back out and a little DHEA helps keep him in the boat.  As does catching a fish now and again.  But my husband is a workaholic and we get busy, sometimes the maintaining things requires a bit of DHEA.  I prefer to take it irregularly as taking it regularly can make me produce even less.

The wheat allergy and being sick really messed up my hormones badly.  I hope that as I eat better and heal, I will be able to better make my own hormones.  But right now that just isn't happening to the degree it needs to, or should.

I have only had a couple of facial hairs to show for using DHEA in the past.  No side-effects.


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Re: Current books on Herbal healing and books on Mythology and Folklore
« Reply #11 on: December 04, 2018, 08:47:13 pm »
What I was looking for was something like The Way of Herbs by Michael Tierra.  I can find out the actual properties of an herb and what systems in the body are affected if I remember correctly.  I used this book quite a bit and loved the way it read. 

Matthew Wood's books are generally excellent - but in this case, especially the Earthwise Herbal (there are two volumes, one for European plants and one for the Americas. They have been out for long enough you want to consult up to date info for contraindications, but other than that, they're very thorough.
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RitaCeleste

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Re: Current books on Herbal healing and books on Mythology and Folklore
« Reply #12 on: December 04, 2018, 11:06:18 pm »
Matthew Wood's books are generally excellent - but in this case, especially the Earthwise Herbal (there are two volumes, one for European plants and one for the Americas. They have been out for long enough you want to consult up to date info for contraindications, but other than that, they're very thorough.

THANK YOU!!!!

These are exactly what I was looking for.  I will need the three book set.  A review stated the two books of herbs have the energies and things described in them, and the first gives to options to consider based on the ailment.

I always have to consider a lot of different things when I pick which thing or things to recommend for a person.  Meds, other conditions, diet, lifestyle. 

One of my dear problem children (he is supposed to be well grown) comes to me with his ailment and shortly a bag arrives with directions.  I don't charge, but not everyone gets a free care package.  He gets it out of me because I know he is the only one who knows exactly how good I am at this.  He has given me dogs.

RitaCeleste

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Re: Current books on Herbal healing and books on Mythology and Folklore
« Reply #13 on: December 05, 2018, 12:02:16 am »
Matthew Wood's books are generally excellent - but in this case, especially the Earthwise Herbal (there are two volumes, one for European plants and one for the Americas. They have been out for long enough you want to consult up to date info for contraindications, but other than that, they're very thorough.

I also can understand enough of the Chinese system to use some of those plants well.  There are more plants and things in books than you can reasonably find though.  For myself, I will source those sometimes.

I have been reluctant to study Indian medicine.  Their diet and lifestyle are far different from most of the locals here I think.  A person who recommends someone eat that way would be scorned.  I have noticed due to their different diets, they are afraid of medicines that pose no problems here and are well tolerated locally.  In India, people fall over dead if they take some of these meds, but here the people have no side-effects and they work fine for us.

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