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Author Topic: Heathen Holidays (Norse and Slavic)  (Read 2515 times)

TheRaginPagan

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Heathen Holidays (Norse and Slavic)
« on: August 25, 2016, 07:37:31 pm »
The recent question about Asatru holidays got me thinking about this. Quite a while ago, I compiled all of the Norse and Slavic holidays that I could find, from books that I have or asking contacts on Facebook. The dates are listed as "Version 1" because they are using the Gregorian Calendar date, and I am in the second year - the "verification year" - of creating a lunar-based calendar of my own. That'll change the dates to "Version 2," using my months and days.

Holidays (Dates V1)

Norse:

Jól (Yule) - [Dec 20 - Jan 1]
The most important of all Norse Holidays. On the night of [Dec 20], the god Yngvi-Freyr rides over the Earth on the back of his boar, bringing light to the world. Jól signifies the beginning and end of all things; the darkest time (shortest hour of the day) and the coming light of the new year. [Ragnarök is a potential topic of contemplation during this time of year. In the myth, the worlds come to and end as new worlds are made; in a like manner, the old year is ending at the same time the new year is beginning.]

The god Óðinn leads the Wild Hunt during this time of year, riding across the sky on his eight-legged horse, Sleipnir. Traditionally, boots were left out by the hearth on [Dec 20], filled with hay and sugar for Sleipnir's journey. In return, Óðinn leaves gifts for the kindness.

Modraniht (Mother's Night) falls on [Dec 21], the second night of Jól. It is a celebration honoring the tribal goddesses and powerful Dísir. As in ancient times, this rite is held on the Winter Solstice.

During Jól, the sonargöltr (sacrificial pig/boar) is sacrificed to the gods. Blóts are made to the gods - Óðinn, Þórr, Frigga, Freyr - and one day (at least) honoring the ancestors.
 
There are 12 days of Jól. It is a time of resolution for old debts and a laying of new wyrd; a time to consciously change one's fate. The most elaborate feasts and high symbel (a highly sacred Heathen rite) are held throughout Jóltide, and it is a time of frith (a sense of community) and oath-taking. Oaths taken during this time are among the most binding.

Work - particularly work associated with Frigga, such as spinning and weaving - would cease during this time, and the last sheaves of hay left in the field would be left or given as an offering to Sleipnir to honor and pacify the Wild Hunt.

Þurseblót (Thor's Blót) - [Full moon of January]
A minor feast day honoring Þórr, the protector of Miðgarðr. During this time, the height of the winter storm season, Þórr's power is invoked to drive back the frost jötnar so that Spring may return to Miðgarðr

Disting/Dísablót (Charming of the Plough)- [Feb 2]
Festival of the Dísir, or those female spirits associated with fate, women who divine, the Valkyries and the Norns. In honoring these figures, we prepare the land for the harvest season. It was said that cattle born during Disting were a sign of prosperity for the coming year.

As Modern Heathens no longer depend on the land for their livelihood, this holiday has been shifted to include any implement of work or creativity, including laptops, cars, phones, etc. It is a time to honor our ability not only to support ourselves by right means, but also the means by which we leave our mark on the world. It is a time to celebrate the renewal of creativity - in both ourselves and the land.

Valisblót - [Feb 14]
A modern Heathen holiday associated with Vali, Óðinn's youngest son. The day also honors the hero Sinfjötli, son of Sigimund, who was born at this time. The day corresponds with Valentine's Day.

Eostre (Ostara) - [March 21]
Festival of Eostre, the Spring goddess. This is a festival of renewal, rejoicing and fertility. Although for most of the North the forces of Winter are still in full sway, Ostara honors the fecundity of the land itself, and the coming of Spring. The rabbit, a notoriously fertile creature, is a symbol of Eostre and her festival.

Modern Heathens celebrate Ostara on the Spring Equinox, It may also be celebrated the first full moon after the Equinox.

Walpurgisnacht/Thrimilci - [April 22-May 1]
The Festival of Walpurga. For nine nights after [April 22], the Wild Hunt rages to an end. Óðinn leads the hunt, Walpurga is the prey. If Walpurga escapes, Winter ends, yet it remains longer if she is captured. Walpurgisnacht is also a time of courtship and romance, and is thus also associated with Freya.

The festival also honors Óðinn's sacrifice for the runes. For nine days and nights, he hung from the World Tree, Yggdrasil - symbolized by the May Pole. Each day represents on of the Nine Worlds; Ásgarðr, Vanaheimr, Jötunheimr/Útgarðr, Álfheimr (Ljósálfheimr), Svartálfaheimr/Niðavellir, Niflheimr, Múspellsheimr, Helheimr, and Miðgarðr.

On the Ninth Night, Óðinn grasped the runes, and died for an instant. All lights are extinguished, representing darkness in the Nine Realms. At the final stroke of Midnight, Óðinn returns, and the bonfires are lit. On Walpurgisnacht, it is said that the dead have full sway upon the Earth.

[May 1] is the festival of Thrimilci - the month now known as May; similar to Eostre it is a festival of joy and fertility, only now Winter is over in finality. Thrimilci is the month of plenty, for food and milk. Goddesses associated with this feast include Walpurga, Holda, and Freya. Charms for the protection of livestock and fields would be offered, and bonfires lit in honor of the gods. Offerings to vaettir (land spirits) and etins (jotnar/giants) to ward off ill luck.

Einherjar Day - [May 30]
A minor modern holiday coinciding with Memorial Day. A day to honor all fallen heroes and warriors who fell and ascended to Valhalla.

Sigurdsblót - [June 9]
Minor festival honoring Sigurd, the hero who slew the dragon Fafnir and won back the treasure of the Rhine.

Midsummer - [June 21]
Celebration of the Summer Solstice, when Sunna is at her most influential. Baldr is said to be sacrificed at this time.

Liðasblót - [July 31 - Aug 1]
The harvest festival, giving thanks to Herta for her bounty. Often alms are given to the poor at this time, or loaves in the shape of the fylfot (sunwheel). A boar/pig is also sacrifices to Freyr at this time.

[August 1] marks Hlaefmaest (Freyfaxi/Lammas). This is a modern holiday that celebrates the preceding harvest. Offerings are given to the gods and vaettir, in thanks and hopes for a safe winter. Traditions include making bread - shaped as a man - for feasting and offering. Modern Heathens connect this holiday to the story of Loki cropping Sif's hair, symbolic of the act of harvesting grain. Hlaefmaest may also be celebrated on the full moon of July.

Harvest End (Mabon) - [Sep 22-23]
Minor blót acknowledging the end of the harvest season, also associated with vintage and mead-making. The full celebration is held off until Winternights.

Winternights (Winterfyllith) [Oct 29-Nov 2]
The beginning of the winter season. Remembrance of the dead and one's ancestors are made during this feast. Winternights is a ceremony of wild abandon, and it marks the end of the summer season and the beginning of the hunting season. The Dísir and Álfar are given offerings, usually a complete feast. Winternights is a time heralding winter, and is associated with gods such as Skaði and Ullr.

It is said that if one sits on a barrow-mound (grave) all night long on Winternights, one would gain powerful divination, shamanic (galdr and seiðr) and bardic (skaldr) powers - if one remains sane. Winternights marks the beginning of the Wild Hunt, which continues until Walpurgisnacht.

Slavic:

Коляда (Kolyada) - [Dec 21-31]
One of the most important Slavic Pagan holidays. At the time of the Winter Solstice, we sing songs for Лада (Lada) and of praise to Перун (Perun), who are now prisoners under frost and snow. During these days, we celebrate the gods by drinking toasts to them and burning bonfires in the forests. We make our way from house to house, singing and dancing in masks. Under the protection of the new year, a goat is sacrificed to Морожко (Morozhko).

Днём Велеса (Dnyom Velesa/Day of Veles) - [Jan 1-6]
These nights are set aside for the worship and honoring of Велес (Veles), the god of pets and cattle. We give thanks for the animals during these days, which bring us food and sustenance. In ancient times, it was necessary to defend these animals from wolves, earning them the secondary name of The Holiday of the Wolves.

Day of Remembrance for Princes Olga - [Jan 3]
On this day, her Great Paganess Princess Olga is celebrated, who brought glory and honor to herself through her heroic actions. She avenged her husband's murder by slaying the perpetrator, Drevlane. She later gave birth to the Great Prince, Sviatoslav, and thus united all the Russias.

Туриси (Turisi) - [Jan 6]
This is the holiday of the bull, Яр-тур (Yar-tur), a symbol of the strong power of life and fertility. On this day, people celebrate by donning masks, parading and imitating the Great Bull. Young and old people join in playing the game "Туриси". This also ends the New Year celebrations.

Oleg the Prophet's Day - [Feb 3]
A day to honor the Varangian (Viking) king Oleg, who was a heroic example of the "Rus-Viking".

Дней Навй (Dnyeii Navii/Navii's Days/Days of the Spirits) - [March 1-4]
A festival of four days, on which the ancestors are honored and remembered. Navii's Days is the "Day of the Dead". People bring sacrifices and invite their ancestors to attend the feast with them.

Prince Igor's Day - [March 3]
Honoring of the Pagan prince who fought against Byzantine Christianity, striking at Constantinople with the aid of Viking warriors.

Масленица (Maslenitsa) - [March 21]
Масленица is the festival of the Spring Equinox, at the end of the Winter Frosts. It is celebrated with feasting, dancing, masks, playing traditional instruments, and contests of strength. Pastries called блини (blini - a potato-based pancake) are made to symbolize the sun.

Комоедици (Komoeditsi) - [March 24]
A day that honors the Great Bear - Медвежий Бог (Medvezhiy Bog - Bear God). Sacrifices of honey and mead are made to this god, who also presides over bees and their works; honey, candies, mead, etc.

Днём Карнав (Dnyom Karnav/Karna's Day) - [April 7]
A second holiday honoring the ancestors. On this day, the Goddess of Mourning is honored. Bowls of water and candles are put near household doorways, and the spirits that passed by are warmed by the gesture.

Днём Лейлав (Dnyom Leylav/Leyla's Day) [April 22]
A feast day honoring Óðinn's Slavic daughter, Лейла (Leyla), a goddess of spring and affection.

Родница (Rodnitsa) - [May 1]
The third holiday honoring the ancestors. Beer, vodka, and food are offered to the dead. This day is named "Родница" to honor Род (Rod), the god of families and the cosmos.

Грудые Росное (Grudie Rosnoe) - [May 20-30]
During these ten days, волвы (volvi, similar to goði,) bring sacrifices to Род and Стрибог (Stribog) for rain and good productive harvests.

Днём Ярилов (Dnyom Yarilov/Yarilo's Day) - [June 4]
A day dedicated to Ярило, the young god of the summer sun and fertility. The day is celebrated with festivities and dancing.

Day of Remembrance for Arkona - [June 15]
A day to remember the last Pagan fortress-city of the region: Arkona, the fortress-city of Jaromaarsburg, the home of the Rani tribe in Rügen, Germany. In 1168, Valdemar the First seized Arkona, toppling the statues to the gods and razing the city, after which the region fell to Christianity. Honor the dead and Свантовит (Svantovit, a name for Перун), the god of the city.

Неделя Русалки (Nedelya Rusalki/Rusalka's Week) - [June 19-24]
During this week the divinities of the rivers, Русалка (Rusalka), are honored with bonfires on the shores of lakes, ponds, and rivers.

Солнцеворот (Solntsevorot/Summer Solstice) - [June 21]
The Summer Solstice, honored with bonfires to Ярило and Купала (Kupala).

?Купалец (Kupalets) - [June 23]
"The Bather", to honor Купала, the goddess of water spirits. A blót is held near water: bonfires are lit, and a doll of bread (in place of a human sacrifice) is sent out onto the waters.

Day of Remembrance for King Sviatoslav the Great - [July 3]
Honoring of the great Pagan King who fought a devastating war with Constantinople, and expanded the lands of Rus.

Днём Перуна (Dnyom Peruna/Perun's Day) - [July 20]
On this day the Great God of Thunder, Перун, is celebrated. In ancient times, sacrifices of a human and bull were given to him. In modern times, festivals for feasts of strength and fist-fights are held, after which is a feast.

Harvest Holiday - [Aug 7]
A holiday of bread and the harvest. People cease reaping in honor of Велес (the crops are his beard). Thanks are brought to Велес and Мокошь (Mokosh' - a handmaiden of Мать Земля (Mat' Zemlya) - Mother Earth) for the harvest, and for success with the next harvest.

Спрошинкы (Sproshinkie) - [Aug 15]
A minor holiday for the end of haymaking.

Day of Remembrance for Novgorod - [Sept 3]
When the people of Novgorod where notified that Dobrinya wanted to Christianize them, they held a вече (veche/chamber - similar to a Þing) and decided to swear and oath: "Do not let Dobrinya into the city, do not let our idols be destroyed." Dobrinya offered them silver, but the people refused him and would not let him ender the city. The highest волвь, under direction of a Pagan priest named Bogomil (also known as "Соловей" - "Nightengale"), went about the city declaring "Better for us to die than let our gods see disgrace."

However, Dobrinya prevailed, and each of the idols were cast into the river, and the wooden sculptures were burned. This is a day of mourning and remembrance for those Pagans of Novgorod, and a reminder of the treachery of Christianity.

Feast to Honor Лада and Лейла - [Sep 8]
A celebration marking the end of summer. Work in the fields comes to an end, and people sing and dance in honor of and farewell to the goddesses of love and summer.

Днём Сварога (Dnyom Svaroga/Day of Svarog) - [Sep 21]
The Autumnal Equinox, the day of the god of Fire and Sky. A toast of mead is given to honor Сварог.

Day of the Ancients - [Oct 26]
The fourth day of honoring the ancestors. Also a day of remembrance for the warriors who were slain in 1380 on Kulikovskaya Field.

Днём Мокошов (Dnyom Mokoshov/Mokosh's Day)  - [Oct 25-Nov 1]
A day honoring the Earth, giving thanks to her for her care of us. Central icons of the feasts in her honor are vegetables - the bounty of the Earth.

Day of Remembrance for Volvh and Goði - [Nov 11]
At the time of Gleb Svatsolavich, a volvh appeared, who went unto the people and told his story: A rebellion of great proportions occurred, and the people were set on killing the bishop. The people became divided: King Gleb and his consort sided with the bishop, but the people sided with the volvh.

The Great Rebellion occurred in Svsdal, the High Volgo Region, in the year 1024. In the year 1227, four volvh were burned to death for "conjuring and working of magic" in Jaroslav's court. Pour out a horn in remembrance of those who died.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2016, 07:52:47 pm by SunflowerP »

Jack

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Re: Heathen Holidays (Norse and Slavic)
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2016, 08:13:57 pm »
Quote from: TheRaginPagan;195430
Quite a while ago, I compiled all of the Norse and Slavic holidays that I could find, from books that I have or asking contacts on Facebook.

Would love to know which of these are personal holidays and which are historical - frex that's not an explanation of the winter solstice I'm familiar with, though I can see how someone would end up there.

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Re: Heathen Holidays (Norse and Slavic)
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2016, 08:17:38 pm »
Quote from: TheRaginPagan;195430
Feast to Honor Лада and Лейла - [Sep 8]
A celebration marking the end of summer. Work in the fields comes to an end, and people sing and dance in honor of and farewell to the goddesses of love and summer.

Also curious if you plan to adapt these dates based on where you live and the agricultural cycle there? Early September seems super early to be done in the fields? Or maybe I'm misunderstanding this description.

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TheRaginPagan

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Re: Heathen Holidays (Norse and Slavic)
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2016, 08:36:09 pm »
Quote from: Jack;195432
Would love to know which of these are personal holidays and which are historical - frex that's not an explanation of the winter solstice I'm familiar with

 
Which one, Коляда? So far as I know that is accurate for the Slavic winter solstice; I spoke with some Slavic Heathen friends of mine. Historically? That I don't know. Unfortunately Slavic Heathenry is a bit of a mess, so far as telling what ancient Slavs did. But Коляда as described is how it's practiced today, so far as I know.

The dates for Version 2 will be modified from my observation of lunar phases, but the dates given for the Slavic holidays were what were given to me as they're practiced in Russia.

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Re: Heathen Holidays (Norse and Slavic)
« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2016, 08:37:11 pm »
Quote from: TheRaginPagan;195437
Which one, Коляда? So far as I know that is accurate for the Slavic winter solstice; I spoke with some Slavic Heathen friends of mine. Historically? That I don't know. Unfortunately Slavic Heathenry is a bit of a mess, so far as telling what ancient Slavs did. But Коляда as described is how it's practiced today, so far as I know.

The dates for Version 2 will be modified from my observation of lunar phases, but the dates given for the Slavic holidays were what were given to me as they're practiced in Russia.
No, the one you described as Yule, where Frey rides his boar through the skies.

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Re: Heathen Holidays (Norse and Slavic)
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2016, 08:41:29 pm »
Quote from: Jack;195438
No, the one you described as Yule, where Frey rides his boar through the skies.

 
Ah, that was a description from a book I've got (they're packed down in Arkansas, and I can't remember the title) that I thought was interesting enough to include.

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Re: Heathen Holidays (Norse and Slavic)
« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2016, 08:46:36 pm »
Quote from: TheRaginPagan;195440
Ah, that was a description from a book I've got (they're packed down in Arkansas, and I can't remember the title) that I thought was interesting enough to include.
Aww, disappointing. This would be way more useful with context, either on where they came from or why they worked for you.

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Re: Heathen Holidays (Norse and Slavic)
« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2016, 09:10:11 pm »
Quote from: Jack;195432
Would love to know which of these are personal holidays and which are historical - frex that's not an explanation of the winter solstice I'm familiar with, though I can see how someone would end up there.

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Can only speak to the Germanic ones. And almost all of them are either modern constructs, or are borrowed from 'related' cultures.

The three that we know for a fact were celebrated are Mother Night, Winter Finding, and Midsummer.

Now, that being said, it is not at all unreasonable to guess that there were holy tides celebrated at all solstices and equinoxes, as well as more local events such as harvest, planting, and other times of significance.

Local significance plays a critical role. Back in NM my kin celebrated the first green chile harvest, because that crop is of vital importance to people in that part of the world. Someone in Maine would be unlikely to celebrate it. Likewise, Winter Finding was supposed to be at first frost, which happens at vastly different times (or not at all!) for different places in the world. So, putting a hard date to such a holiday is foolish.

Ultimately, the date of celebration of the holy tides is entirely up to the tribe celebrating it. These are not things that can be dictated out of a book or from an impersonal and distant national level organization.

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Re: Heathen Holidays (Norse and Slavic)
« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2016, 09:57:29 pm »
Quote from: Jack;195441
This would be way more useful with context, either on where they came from or why they worked for you.

 
I'll have to get back to you on which book the description of Jól came from. I want to say it was from the "Our Troth: Volume 1" book, but I'm not certain.

For myself, when I was able to practice openly my Jól blended both Norse and Slavic elements. I would make a snow effigy (basically a snowman with intent) of Морожко, and leave offerings out for Sleipnir and Odin.

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Re: Heathen Holidays (Norse and Slavic)
« Reply #9 on: August 26, 2016, 10:38:28 am »
Quote from: TheRaginPagan;195430
The recent question about Asatru holidays got me thinking about this. Quite a while ago, I compiled all of the Norse and Slavic holidays that I could find, from books that I have or asking contacts on Facebook.

 
Nifty read, thanks for sharing!
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