Title: The Bridge: Human Ascension Into Divine Understanding
Author(s): Ellen Jent
Published 2012 by Xlibris
ISBN: 1469137151
ISBN-13: 978-1469137155
Paperback, 181 pages
List: $19.95
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Reviewer: Mike Gleason

Ascencionism is one of those topics which tend to engender very firm positions. You believe it to be the next great step in planetary evolution; you think it is all New Age hogwash; you know nothing about it, and have no desire to learn about it. It suffers from all the maladies common to newly emergent philosophies including over zealous converts and jargon which is incomprehensible to many who are on the outside.

Ms Jent, to her credit, is very clear about her beliefs while not attempting to "convert" anyone else. This book is about her journey on her road to accepting ascensionism as reality.

There were a few editing glitches (on page 24, there is a total lack of spacing between words in the first sentence of the second paragraph; there are few other instances of the same thing scattered throughout) and the overall spacing leaves a lot to be desired (the book would be reduced to about half the length if the line spacing was reduced to normal). On the other hand, all that white space makes it easier to read in many ways.

Long-time readers of my reviews will be aware of my low tolerance for poor writing and editing (especially the misuse of homophones). Far too many writers rely on spell-checking programs to catch errors and, unfortunately, it appears that Ms Jent is one of them. Most of the errors I encountered were instances which computer programs would pass, but a human editor would (most likely) have caught (Bring back human editors!).

There is a wealth of data assembled within the pages of this book. Unfortunately, some of it is presented in a fashion which leave something to be desired. As an example, when presenting information regarding the hierarchy of the angels, several of them appear on multiple lists with no explanation on the crossovers. Granted that information can be gathered from other sources, a short explanation would help new-comers understand how, and why, these angels hold multiple positions.

Another writing problem I encountered was inconsistency when it came to verb tenses within the same sentence. That, coupled with the occasional incomplete sentence, was enough to throw me off the rhythm I had established while reading the book.

I would like to give this book a glowing review, but I really can't do it. It is a good book and, assuming it goes into a second printing, if the editing glitches can be ironed out, it will definitely be one I would recommend for most readers. It is good, but it could be better.

As a portrayal of Ms Jent's position on the subject of ascensionism, however, it cannot be faulted.


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